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Credit Cards vs. Short-term Business Loans 

Big plans come with a big price tag.

As most entrepreneurs and small business owners know, there are times when the cash you have on hand can’t cover the expenses essential to growth. It’s at this point that you’re confronted with the question of funding: Do you go with an SMB lender, or do you try credit cards?

The Case Against Lenders

SMB lenders know that you’re in a jam and that you want your money as fast as you can get it. This is why you’ll see many lenders emphasize the amount of money you can get from them and the supposedly lightning-fast time between filling out your application and the money showing up in your checking account.

But unless they’re acting as the middleman for government-backed SBA loans, there’s a good chance you’ll be charged incredible interest rates that will tack on big fees to your weekly or daily repayment schedule. Some companies use factoring, which is a technical way of saying you pay points every week or day on the money you lend. Others use merchant-based charges that take a cut of your daily sales to pay back your loan. In many cases, the rates you pay, when extrapolated out over one year, range from 40 to 120 percent.

The Case for Small Business Credit Cards

Now, I understand that there are situations where your business needs tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars to buy inventory for an upcoming season or to cover your day-to-day operational expenses.

However, if you don’t find yourself in that position, then business credit cards can be an excellent option for funding. The reason I like credit cards instead of small business loans is that they tend to give you something in return for your business, and their interest rates can be relatively low for customers with excellent credit scores. Most business credit cards offer two types of rewards: cash or points. Both rewards vehicles are based on per-dollar rewards rates. Here are a few of the best credit cards for small businesses right now.

  • Chase Ink Business Preferred’s Points — The Chase Ink Preferred gives you a 3:1 rate on social media/search engine advertising, phone/internet/TV services, travel and shipping. These categories are the essentials of a modern business, so there’s a tremendous opportunity here for rewards. This 3% rate is capped at $150,000 in spending across all categories, at which point the rate drops to 1%. Consider this: $150K equals 450,000 rewards points that can be transferred to Hyatt, Southwest, United, Marriott and other travel partners within the Chase rewards network. Any employee cards that you request will also earn points for you, too.
  • Spark Cash for Business’ Cash Back — Capital One’s Spark Cash for Business card gives a 2% cash-back rate on all purchases. There are no limits on the rewards here, so if you spend $150,000 in a year, you’ll get $3,000 back in cash. Capital One’s Spark Miles card works the same way, except the cash rewards you earn are only applied to travel purchases. Perhaps the only knock on Chase and Capital One cards is that they have credit limits.
  • American Express Business Gold’s Limitless Spending — The AmEx Business Gold has no credit limit, but you have to pay off your balance in full every month to avoid high-interest repayment plans. This no-limit functionality is why the AmEx is known as a “charge card” and not a traditional credit card. If you’re anticipating that you’ll spend more than $50,000 a month, you may want to consider this card as an option. The no-cap spending gives you the freedom to make big purchases on a moment’s notice. The card also gives you a 3x/2x/1x tier of rewards that can be redeemed across 17 airline partners, four hotel partners or redeemed for cash back. The AmEx Gold also has a certain swagger to it, but all this is meaningless if you don’t have the discipline (or the cash) to pay off your balance every month.
  • Wells Fargo Business Platinum — This card allows you to choose between earning 1.5% cash back on every purchase or 1:1 rewards points on every purchase. The advantage to this card is that it boasts an APR of the prime rate plus 7.99% which, at the time of publishing, equates to an 11.99% APR that’s virtually unbeatable by other business credit cards or SMB lenders. It does come with a max credit limit of $50,000, so keep that in mind if you decide to apply for the card.

Final Thoughts: Credit Cards Offer Rewards, Lower Rates

As I mentioned earlier, the fact that lenders can send you hundreds of thousands of dollars in a matter of hours or days may be the only suitable solution for certain companies that are in certain financial situations.

However, there are a majority of us who can benefit from the rewards programs that business credit cards offer. You’ll have the luxury of only paying once a month as opposed to the daily or weekly payments that most SMB lenders require you to pay. Whether it’s free travel or cash, credit card issuers are willing to put money in your pocket in order to get and keep your business.

By | June 21st, 2017|Business Finance|0 Comments

Professional LLCs – FAQs

Happy June! Summer is fast approaching and with new beginnings, we bring you a new post in our FAQ series! This month, we discuss the Professional LLC, or “PLLC” and the ins and outs of filing them.

 

Q: What is a PLLC?

A: A Professional Limited Liability Company is a special type of LLC that’s designed for licensed professionals, such as accountants, lawyers, and doctors (typically, professions that require a license). Some states do not allow licensed professionals to form an LLC since they don’t want them to escape personal responsibility for professional malpractice by “hiding behind” the personal liability protection of an LLC. Instead, they allow professionals to form an LLC. But, specific rules vary by state.

 

Q: If I’m a licensed professional, how can I find out if my state allows me to form an LLC, PLLC, or something else?

A: The LLC and PLLC are state constructs; as such, rules vary widely by state. For example, professionals in New York cannot form an LLC, but may form a PLLC. Professionals in California cannot form an LLC or a PLLC, but can form a RLLP (Registered Limited Liability Partnership) or PC (Professional Corporation). And professionals in Arizona can choose between an LLC or PLLC. And the specific rules within a state may also depend on the type of profession as well.

The easiest way to determine your business entity options is to give us a call at 1.888.449.2638 and we’ll discuss which entities are available for your profession in your state.

 

Q: How do I form a PLLC?

A: As expected, the process to form a PLLC is more involved than forming an LLC. You’ll typically need to have your state licensing board approve your articles of organization first (again, this requirement varies by state). As a result, it takes longer to form a PLLC than an LLC. After the proper state licensing board has approved your articles of organization, then you will need to file the articles of organization and other formation paperwork with the state. Most states require a signature and license number of a licensed professional to form the LLC.

Our small business experts can help you with each stage of the process. First, we’ll ensure that your particular business needs to file a PLLC in your state. Then, we’ll help obtain the necessary approvals and file your paperwork.

 

Q: Who can be an owner/member of a PLLC?

A: While specifics vary by state, many states limit who can be an owner/member of an PLLC. In some states, only licensed professionals of the specific service can be members in a PLLC.

 

Q: How does limited liability work with a PLLC? 

A: Like an LLC, the PLLC creates a separation between the individual owners and the business. But there’s a very important distinction. You will still be personally liable for malpractice claims related to your own actions. For this reason, you’ll need to have a good malpractice insurance policy even if you form a PLLC. However, a PLLC will typically protect you from personally liability for the business debts, as well as the malpractice of other owners within the company.

 

Do you need help registering a PLLC or have a questions regarding the process? Call the CorpNet.com team today for a free business consultation at: 888.449.2638

                               

How Much Does It Cost To Incorporate Your Business?

So you’ve decided to either form an LLC or incorporate your business?

Kudos to you for thinking about the benefits of liability protection and possible tax advantages that come with formally establishing your company as a separate legal entity.

Like many small business owners, you may now be wondering in what state you should register your company?

Some entrepreneurs opt to incorporate or form an LLC within the state they live. Others look around for a state with the most cost-effective fees. For example, Delaware has become a popular place for corporations because companies formed in the state pay minimal state tax if they do not actually conduct business there.

Formation and annual report filing fees sometimes sway the decision of which state a business will register. Those fees can vary a good deal from one state to the next. I advise you not to make your choice based solely on lowest cost. While those initial costs and ongoing annual report filing fees may look attractive, that doesn’t mean you’ll save a whole heap of money by registering your business in a different state.

Realize that when a business incorporates in one state but physically maintains an office or conducts business in another state, the business may need to register in that other state, too. And yes, that means the business must pay those state filing fees, annual report fees (if applicable), and taxes.

In most cases, small businesses benefit most by incorporating or forming an LLC in the state where they’re located. But it’s helpful to have some idea of the prices in other states, as well. After all, if your business grows and expands, you could likely be doing business in more than only your home state!

For your convenience, I’ve compiled a list of the current formation and annual maintenance fees for each of the 50 United States. These rates reflect what is presently true in June 2017. Keep in mind that they are subject to change by the states:

Alabama: LLC filing fees: $165; LLC Annual Report; $0, Incorporation filing fees: $165; Corporation Annual Report: $0

Alaska: LLC filing fees: $250; LLC Initial Report: $0; LLC Annual Report: $100; Incorporation filing fees: $250; Corporation Initial Report: $0; Corporation Annual Report: $100

Arizona: LLC filing fees: $85; LLC Publication fee: $299 (required); LLC Annual Report: $0; Incorporation filing fees: $60; Corporation Publication fee: $299 (required); Corporation Annual Report: $45

Arkansas: LLC filing fees: $50; LLC Annual Report: $150; Incorporation filing fees: $50; Corporation Annual Report: $150

California: LLC filing fees: $75; LLC Initial Report $20; LLC Annual Report: $20; Incorporation filing fees: $105; Corporation Initial Report: $25; Corporation Annual Report: $25

Colorado: LLC filing fees: $50; LLC Annual Report: $10; Incorporation filing fees: $50; Corporation Annual Report: $10

Connecticut: LLC filing fees: $175; LLC Annual Report: $20; Incorporation filing fees: $455; Corporation Annual Report: $100

District of Columbia: LLC filing fees: $220; LLC Annual Report: $300; Incorporation filing fees: $220; Corporation Annual Report: $300

Delaware: LLC filing fees: $140; LLC Annual Report: $300; Incorporation filing fees: $140; Corporation Annual Report: $225 (based on min number of authorized shares)

Florida: LLC filing fees: $155; LLC Annual Report: $138.75; Incorporation filing fees: $78.75; Corporation Annual Report: $150

Georgia: LLC filing fees: $100; LLC Annual Report: $50; Incorporation filing fees: $100 Corporation Publication fees: $150 (required for Corps); Corporation Initial Report: $50; Corporation Annual Report: $50

Hawaii: LLC filing fees: $50; LLC Annual Report: $15; Incorporation filing fees: $50; Corporation Annual Report: $15

Idaho: LLC filing fees: $100; LLC Annual Report: $0; Incorporation filing fees: $101; Corporation Annual Report: $0

Illinois: LLC filing fees: $500; LLC Annual Report: $305; Incorporation filing fees: $175; Corporation Annual Report: $155

Indiana: LLC filing fees: $90; LLC Annual Report: $30; Incorporation filing fees: $90; Corporation Annual Report: $30

Iowa: LLC filing fees: $50; LLC Annual Report: $45; Incorporation filing fees: $50; Corporation Annual Report: $45

Kansas: LLC filing fees: $160; LLC Annual Report: $55; Incorporation filing fees: $90; Corporation Annual Report: $55

Kentucky: LLC filing fees: $55; LLC Annual Report: $15; Incorporation filing fees: $55; Corporation Annual Report: $15

Louisiana: LLC filing fees: $100; LLC Annual Report: $30; Incorporation filing fees: $100; Corporation Annual Report: $30

Maine: LLC filing fees: $175; LLC Annual Report: $85; Incorporation filing fees: $145; Corporation Annual Report: $85

Maryland: LLC filing fees: $155; LLC Annual Report: depends on revenue (min fee $300); Incorporation filing fees: $155; Corporation Annual Report: depends on revenue (min fee $300)

Massachusetts: LLC filing fees: $520; LLC Annual Report: $520; Incorporation filing fees: $295; Corporation Annual Report: $135

Michigan: LLC filing fees: $50; LLC Annual Report: $25; Incorporation filing fees: $60; Corporation Annual Report: $25

Minnesota: LLC filing fees: $160; LLC Annual Report: $0; Incorporation filing fees: $160; Corporation Annual Report: $0

Mississippi: LLC filing fees: $50; LLC Annual Report: $25; Incorporation filing fees: $50; Corporation Annual Report: $25

Missouri: LLC filing fees: $50; LLC Annual Report: $0; Incorporation filing fees: $58; Corporation Initial Report: $45; Corporation Annual Report: $45

Montana: LLC filing fees: $70; LLC Annual Report: $15; Incorporation filing fees: $70; Corporation Annual Report: $15

Nebraska: LLC filing fees: $120; LLC Publication fees: $150; LLC Annual Report: $26; Incorporation filing fees: $65; Corporation Publication fees: $150; Corporation Annual Report: $26

Nevada: LLC filing fees: $75; LLC Initial Report: $325; LLC Annual Report: $325; Incorporation filing fees: $75; Corporation Initial Report: $325; Corporation Annual Report: $325

New Hampshire: LLC filing fees: $100; LLC Annual Report: $100; Incorporation filing fees: $100; Corporation Annual Report: $100

New Jersey: LLC filing fees: $125; LLC Annual Report: $50; Incorporation filing fees: $125; Corporation Annual Report: $50

New Mexico: LLC filing fees: $50; LLC Annual Report: $0; Incorporation filing fees: $100; Corporation Initial Report: $25; Corporation Annual Report: $25

New York: LLC filing fees: $210; LLC Annual Report: $9; LLC Publication fees: Starting from $425-$1200; Incorporation filing fees: $145; Corporation Annual Report: $9

North Carolina: LLC filing fees: $125; LLC Annual Report: $202; Incorporation filing fees: $125; Corporation Annual Report: $20

North Dakota: LLC filing fees: $135; LLC Annual Report: $50; Incorporation filing fees: $100; Corporation Annual Report: $25

Ohio: LLC filing fees: $125; LLC Annual Report: $0; Incorporation filing fees: $125; Corporation Annual Report: $0

Oklahoma: LLC filing fees: $104; LLC Annual Report: $25; Incorporation filing fees: $52; Corporation Annual Report: $0

Oregon: LLC filing fees: $100; LLC Annual Report: $100; Incorporation filing fees: $100; Corporation Annual Report: $100

Pennsylvania: LLC filing fees: $125; LLC Annual Report: $0; Incorporation filing fees: $125; Corporation Annual Report: $0 Incorporation Publication fees: $299

Rhode Island: LLC filing fees: $150; LLC Annual Report: $50; Incorporation filing fees: $230; Corporation Annual Report: $50

South Carolina: LLC filing fees: $110; LLC Annual Report: $0; Incorporation filing fees: $135; Corporation Annual Report: $0; Incorporation Attorney Signature fees: $100

South Dakota: LLC filing fees: $150; LLC Annual Report: $50; Incorporation filing fees: $150; Corporation Annual Report: $50

Tennessee: LLC filing fees: $325; LLC Annual Report: $310; Incorporation filing fees: $125; Corporation Annual Report: $20

Texas: LLC filing fees: $310; LLC Annual Report: (depends on gross annual revenue); Incorporation filing fees: $310; Corporation Annual Report: (depends on gross annual revenue)

Utah: LLC filing fees: $72; LLC Annual Report: $15; Incorporation filing fees: $72; Corporation Annual Report: $15

Vermont: LLC filing fees: $125; LLC Annual Report: $25; Incorporation filing fees: $125; Corporation Annual Report: $35

Virginia: LLC filing fees: $104; LLC Annual Report: $50; Incorporation filing fees: $79; Corporation Annual Report: $100

Washington: LLC filing fees: $200; LLC Initial Report: $10; LLC Annual Report: $73; Incorporation filing fees: $200; Corporation Initial Report: $10; Corporation Annual Report: $73

West Virginia: LLC filing fees: $132; LLC Annual Report: $25; Incorporation filing fees: $82; Corporation Annual Report: $25

Wisconsin: LLC filing fees: $130; LLC Annual Report: $25; Incorporation filing fees: $100; Corporation Annual Report: $40

Wyoming: LLC filing fees: $103; LLC Annual Report: $52; Incorporation filing fees: $103; Corporation Annual Report: $52

Whether you form your LLC or incorporate in your home state, in a different state, or in multiple states, remember CorpNet can save you time and alleviate hassle by handling the registration and ongoing compliance filings for you. Get the peace of mind that your paperwork is done accurately and on time; contact us today to get started!

Local SEO for Your Local Business: Get Listed Where It Counts Most

Local SEO, the art and science of optimizing your business website for local search, has a few more steps to it than your general SEO practice. After you’ve identified your general keywords and optimized your content for them, you still need to take a few more steps to make your local business stand out from your competition.

Most local search is performed with the intention of an immediate visit, so you want potential customers to be able to find you as they drive around town and in emergency situations, if that is relevant to your product or service.

Let’s take a look at the finishing touches to your SEO strategy, so you rank highly and are easily found by your target prospects.

Standardize Your Business Display

By standardizing your business display, we are talking about making sure your NAP information is the same from place to place on the web and across your website.

  • N = Name
  • A = Address
  • P = Phone

You want the exact same details formatted in the same way when other websites display your business. First, decide exactly how your information should be presented, then use Schema.org markup, so it will display correctly no matter where it appears online.

Claim Your Google My Business Page

Your Google My Business page is an important factor in your Google search engine rankings. When you claim your page, it is critical that you fill out all information, especially your categories, to get the edge on your competitors.

  • Use a correctly formatted, unique description that includes links.
  • Select the correct categories for your business.
  • Upload as many photos as you can.
  • Add a local phone number to the listing, not just the toll-free number.
  • Upload a high-resolution profile image and cover photo.
  • If relevant, enter the days and times you are open.
  • Get reviews from real customers.

Get Local Reviews

A local business needs local business reviews; they have a direct impact on your local search rankings. Although Google Reviews are important, don’t neglect other review sites such as:

  • Yelp
  • Trip Advisor
  • Angie’s List
  • Merchant Circle
  • Local directories

Encourage your current customer base to provide reviews by giving out an incentive, such as a discount on products or services. Make it easy for them to know where to put the review by placing instructions on your website, a good thing to do if your customers are not familiar with the online review sites.

Understand Local On-Page SEO Factors

On-page SEO content weighs heavily in local search listings. Make your business stand out by optimizing your website pages for your city or region. On your landing page add the name of your city plus a relevant keyword, for example:

Houston Tax Attorney

Place the city-keyword combination in the following areas of your landing pages:

  • Title tag
  • H1 tag
  • URL
  • In the content
  • Image ALT attributes

One more thing you can do to get to the top of the Google search engine page rankings is to embed a Google Map with your business marker into the landing page. Users will know immediately where you are located, making them more likely to select you.

Build Local Links and Citations

Simply put, a citation is an online reference to your business’s NAP. It does not have to be linked to your website as long as your NAP is in the same format as on your website, across citations, and around the web. (See why standardization and markup are so important?)

Links refer, of course, to links from other websites to yours. Make them count. Build links from high authority websites, preferably local to you, that talk about similar topics as you. Search engine rankings rely heavily on relevant, high-authority links so beware; don’t accept a bunch of spammy, non-relevant links. Google will penalize you.

Where should you have citations? Find out where your competitors have theirs and add yours. You can build citations through top national directories (besides Google My Business), including:

  • BBB (Better Business Bureau)
  • YouTube
  • Bing Places
  • Yelp
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Manta (especially for small businesses)
  • YP Yellow Pages
  • Merchant Circle

Don’t forget industry directories depending on your niche. You can find these by searching with your keywords. An example of an industry directly is Findlaw.com for attorneys.

Finally, local directories should have your information:

  • Chamber of Commerce
  • City directory
  • County directory
  • Local business listings

As a local business, local SEO is imperative to your business’s existence in today’s online society. More searches are performed for local products and services than any other. Don’t miss out; make sure your NAP information is correct, and you are listed in every relevant directory.

Take the few extra SEO steps for local listing and search engine rankings and get prepared for the traffic.

Start & Run Your Business Right: Join Our Facebook Group and Partner Program

The process of starting a business is both thrilling and intimidating. There’s the exhilaration that comes from working through the details and making the dream a reality. And then, there are the business formation options and ongoing compliance requirements that often raise questions and sometimes cause confusion.

That’s why I’m hosting the “Business Formations & Compliance” Facebook group.

The group is a place where business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs can get insight on anything related to forming a business and complying with the rules to keep it in good standing. You can join for free, so there’s no reason not to take advantage of the expertise you’ll find there!

What Can You Expect?

We’ll cover a breadth of topics related to starting and maintaining a business that complies with federal and state requirements.

A few examples include:

  • Filing a DBA
  • Forming an LLC with an S Corp election
  • Incorporating as a C Corporation
  • Annual report obligations
  • Corporate minutes
  • Business name searches
  • Trademark filings

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. No matter what filing requirements you need more information about, I’ll be there to answer the questions you and other group members post.

You can also meet up with me on Facebook Live Fridays when I’m available in real time to offer tips and insight.

Also New: The CorpNet Partner Program

CorpNet has launched a Partner Program for accountants, bookkeepers, attorneys, business advisors, and other service professionals that wish to give their clients additional value. As our Partner, you can offer formation and compliance services to your customers—with all fulfillment and liability handled by CorpNet. Sign up for free today! Besides strengthening your client relationships, you’ll also get 50 percent of the profits from any formation and compliance services that you sell.*

Seize The Possibilities!

Join the Business Formations & Compliance Facebook group and check out our CorpNet Partner Program. Bringing insight, education, and the potential for additional income, these platforms offer opportunities for empowerment and growth.

*50% commission is based on our gross revenue – minus costs. The 50% profit sharing for partners is a limited offering for early birds. Please sign up now to be grandfathered and start earning right away.

How To Choose And Legally Use Your Business Name

The name you choose for your business will be one of your most powerful and valuable assets. As one of the primary ways customers distinguish you from your competitors, your business name wields a lot of power. The right name can help propel you to success; the wrong name can put you at a disadvantage.

Besides choosing a business name that:

  • Projects how you want people to view your business (e.g., edgy, professional, high-tech, academic, approachable, etc.)
  • Makes it easy for customers to identify what you do.
  • Is simple enough to be memorable.

I encourage you to have all your legal i’s dotted and t’s crossed when selecting a name.

How To Choose A Business Name That’s Yours To Use

Start on the right path immediately by making sure another company doesn’t already have dibs on the business name you’d like to use. If someone else has already claimed it, you could end up in legal trouble if you start using it online and printing it on business cards, checks, marketing materials, etc.

How can you know your preferred business name isn’t spoken for already?

Use a business name search tool or contact your state filing office to see if the name you want to use is currently claimed within your state. Also, I encourage you to use a trademark search application tool to see if the name is available in all of the United States. That will allow you to identify if anyone else has registered for, been granted, or abandoned a trademark for your name.

How To Make The Name Officially Yours

So, you say your name is available? Great!

Now it’s time to make it legally yours within the state you’ll operate your business. As I mentioned earlier, your name represents your brand. If another company offering similar products and services were to use the same (or a very similar) name, it could confuse customers and damage your professional reputation.

If you’re a sole proprietor or partnership, filing a DBA (“Doing Business As”)—also known as a fictitious name—to protect your name in the state doesn’t cost a lot of time or money. If you plan to use your own personal first and last name in your business name, you will not need a DBA. For example, Celia Washington wouldn’t have to register “Celia Washington’s Bookkeeping Services ” as a DBA.

By registering your business as a formal legal entity (Limited Liability Company or Corporation) in your state, your business name will automatically become protected in that state. Realize, however, that another business in another state could use your name there. Also, it’s legal for a sole proprietorship or partnership to use your name as a DBA in your state.

If simply registering in your state doesn’t put you at ease about your rights to your business name, I recommend you consider filing for a federal trademark. If the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) grants your trademark request, it will be illegal for others to use your business name in any of the 50 states.

Don’t Hesitate To Seek Expert Assistance

To avoid lost time and money when choosing a name and taking legal steps to protect it, I encourage you to consult with professionals who can guide and assist you. Consider seeking the input and feedback of branding experts with experience in zeroing in on a business name that will serve your company for the long term. Other helpful resources include attorneys who can advise you in making sound decisions and step you through the legal process of securing and registering your business name. And when you need to prepare the necessary documents to register your business with your state or file for a federal trademark, you might save a heap of time and money by using a reputable online business document filing service.

As you can see, choosing a business name demands more than just slapping words together. You need to devote some thought and time to it. But I assure you, it will be time and energy well spent. Remember, your business name has influence that could make or break your brand.

By | May 22nd, 2017|Naming Your Business|0 Comments

How to Use a Blog to Boost Your Business

Nowadays, a business website is considered incomplete if it doesn’t have a blog. Blogging started out as a mere hobby, an online journal where individuals would share their thoughts, feelings, experiences and opinions. However, businesses have found that blogging is also a valuable resource for lead generation, customer service, boosting search engine rankings, and brand marketing and promotion.

Today we give you a number of ways starting your own business blog could give your business a much needed boost in the right direction.

1. Get More Online Exposure

Businesses devote entire departments to marketing, where the only goal is to constantly think of the next big promotion, event, or advertisement that can lure customers in. Nowadays, instead of investing money in other online marketing tactics, more companies are opting for the creating a company blog.

According to a recent study, company websites with blogs get 55% more traffic, with 37% of marketers saying that blogging is the most important type of content marketing. A company blog, as long as it is carefully maintained, can be an infinite source of leads for the company. Engaging content will bring in interested viewers, who will then share your blog posts to other people who might need them. Free advertising at its best!

2. Cement Your Reputation as an Industry Professional

Customers are more likely to give you their hard-earned money if they can see that you, as a company, know what you’re talking about. Blogs are a great way to disseminate important information that your target audience might find useful. For example, if your company is a provider of loans, having a few articles on how to save money, raise one’s credit score and ensure loan application success gives off the impression that your company is knowledgeable in all matters concerning your field.

3. Promote More Customer Interaction

Before, customers could only reach a company through phone, or email. Customers felt that businesses were distant and uncaring of their needs. Blogging is a great way to close the gap between consumers and businesses. At the end of every blog post, consumers can share their thoughts about the post and the company as a whole through the comments section.

Businesses can place someone in charge of answering these comments to encourage interaction. This makes businesses seem more “human” in the eyes of a consumer, which helps convert leads. Existing customers are more loyal to companies who will take note of their suggestions and make changes in the company accordingly.

4. Boost Search Engine Rankings

Blogs make business websites appealing not only to visitors, but to search engines as well. Imagine, each blog you write is a separate page that can be indexed, giving you more chances of being found on search engines. Around 5-7 billion searches are made by people each day. Now imagine if even a small fraction of these people find their way to your website. Let’s say your company sells dietary products online and you have several blog articles on dieting. So the next time someone searches for “common diet myths” for example, if you have a blog post on diet myths, your blog post has a chance of showing up on the search engine results. The more blog posts you have, the more likely you’ll have something that someone out there is searching for.

Google’s algorithm keeps changing, but some of their basic rules don’t change. Search engines like Google favor pages with longer content (around 1,140-1,285) and value viewer retention more than number of views. So it matters less how many people view a certain page, and more how long they stay engaged with that page. Blog posts with interesting content, especially those with images and videos embedded on them, can sustain the interest of viewers for several minutes.

5. Get Extra Income For Your Company

While the main purpose of company blogs is to attract new customers, interact with old ones, convert viewership to sales and boost brand reputation, there’s nothing wrong with making a little bit of money on the side. There are a variety of ways for you to monetize your company blog, from well-placed ads to affiliate marketing. Affiliate marketing is basically earning commission for referring another business. For example, if your business provides renovation and repair services, you can apply as an affiliate for manufacturers of construction materials and fixtures. Then, on your company’s blog, you can write a review on these manufacturers, linking to their website in the process. Every time a viewer clicks on the link and makes a purchase, you make a commission from it.

Conclusion

Blogging can greatly affect a company’s reputation, online exposure, customer service, and income generation, making it a powerful tool that is accessible even to smaller and newer businesses. Being new and having fewer resources is no excuse to ignore the benefits of blogging. In fact, business with blogs experience 126% more lead growth compared to businesses without a blog. Who knows, blogging might just be the key to transforming your virtually unknown business into a thriving, influential powerhouse.

Registered Agents – FAQs

Happy May! This month, we will be going over the requirements for being or maintaining a registered agent and what the registered agent does for your business.

 

Q: What is the purpose of the registered agent?

A: The registered agent is the person named to receive important legal and tax documents on behalf of a business in a given state. This includes important mail sent by the state (annual reports or statements), state tax documents, as well as any Notices of Litigation. Virtually all states require corporations, LLCs, LLPs, LPs and nonprofits to appoint a registered agent in the state where the company is formed. And, if a company registers to transact business in another state (via a foreign qualification), it will typically need a registered agent in that state too.

 

Q: What are the requirements for a registered agent?

A: The registered agent can either be an individual or a company approved by the state to be a registered agent. The registered agent must be located at a street address – P.O. boxes are not acceptable. In most cases, the registered agent also needs to be located in the state where the company is incorporated or qualified to conduct business. Keep in mind that a P.O. box is usually allowed as the mailing address for the business.

 

Q: Can I serve as my company’s registered agent?

A: Yes, absolutely! However, states require that the registered agent must be available at all times during normal business hours to receive and sign for any important documents. That’s because the state needs to make sure a summons, lawsuit, or other official state documents are actually received by the company and not “lost in the mail.” If you’re confident that you’ll always be on hand during normal business hours at the designated address, you can be your registered agent. But most small business owners prefer to have a third party serve as the registered agent for the state.

 

Q: Will my business fall out of good standing without a registered agent?

A: Here’s one scenario of what can happen. Let’s say you fail to maintain a registered agent service, or you choose to serve as your own registered agent and either move or aren’t around to receive an official communication. If an official document from the state can’t be delivered to/accepted by your registered agent, then the state may put your business in bad standing until you update the state records with an active registered agent.

 

Q: What is Service of Process?

A: This refers to the delivery of legal documents such as a lawsuit, summons, subpoena for records, wage garnishment or any other official correspondence from the state. Your business is required to have a registered agent in the state who can receive service of process during normal business hours.

 

Do you have a questions regarding a Registered Agent? Call the CorpNet.com team today for a free business consultation at: 888.449.2638

 

                               

Share, Learn, Grow – Join The “Business Startup Experts” Facebook Group!

With a passion for helping entrepreneurs work toward fulfilling their dreams, it thrills me to welcome you to join the new Business Startup Experts group that I’ve started on Facebook. Its purpose is simple: To serve as a hub for startup experts of all types to exchange knowledge with one another and with new business owners.

I invite anyone who either has or is looking for insight on starting and growing a business. The following types of professionals and many others will find it an engaging place to showcase their expertise and make valuable connections:

  • Accountants
  • Business coaches
  • Tax advisors
  • Attorneys
  • Marketing and branding experts
  • IT consultants
  • Quickbooks advisors
  • Insurance professionals
  • Members of other business groups (like Business Rockstars, Entrepreneurs’ Organization, Secret Entourage, etc.)

The Business Startup Experts Facebook group is a free membership forum where you can ask or answer business startup questions. It is where you will have access to premium, moderated content that can help you move your business forward.

In addition to informative, interactive posts, the group also holds Facebook Live online streaming events hosted by various types of business experts who will share their tips and answer questions.

As you’re more active within the group, you may have an opportunity to become a moderator. In that role, you can gain additional exposure as an expert in your field. And of course, aspiring entrepreneurs will benefit from being a part of the group. Eventually, the group will have experts in virtually every aspect of starting a business. What a powerful resource it will be!

Let’s get down to business—together! 

The more startup experts and aspiring entrepreneurs we have in the group, the greater it will empower all of us. Please visit the Business Startup Experts group on Facebook and request to join it today. Together, we can all become savvier, stronger business owners!

National Small Business Week: What It Means For You And How To Make The Most Of It

Sunday, April 30, 2017, marked the start of National Small Business Week. From that day through Saturday, May 6, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has organized a variety of events to celebrate small businesses and the impact they have on our national and local economies.

According to the SBA National Small Business Week website, “More than half of Americans either own or work for a small business, and they create about two out of every three new jobs in the U.S. each year.”

I say that’s reason to celebrate! Don’t you agree?

We’re celebrating at CorpNet.com by offering  10 percent off of the cost of any complete business formation package this week only! Visit the CorpNet website’s home page and click the “Get Started” button to view the formation packages for your state. At checkout, use code CNSBW to apply your discount.

Other highlights of the week will include: small business award ceremonies; a live chat over social media with SBA Administrator Linda McMahon and Facebook’s VP and Chief Privacy Officer for Policy Erin Egan about how to start and grow a business; a road tour that kicks off in the Indycar town of Indianapolis and continues with stops in Arlington, Texas and ends in Fresno, California; and free webinars.

What Does This Mean For You?

In a word: Plenty!

As the SBA is promoting National Small Business Week, you can piggyback off the momentum and remind your customers about why supporting small businesses is the way to go.

  • Local small businesses typically hire local people from within their communities.
  • Local small businesses often seek to source raw materials from local suppliers, thus further stimulating the local economy.
  • Local small businesses tend to be vested in and give back to their communities in time, talent, and dollars to improve the lives of those around them.
  • Local small businesses build personal relationships with their customers and nurture a sense of community.

How Can You Get Involved?

For starters, check out the SBA National Small Business Week website for what’s happening each day from April 30 to May 6. Also, generate some buzz by posting about National Small Business Week on social media (hashtag #smallbusinessweek). And consider offering some special deals to draw people to your local small business. Even better, partner with other local small businesses in your area to cross-promote each other’s products, services, and special offers. That’s a powerful way to show your solidarity as small business owners.

A Time To Shine

SBA’s National Small Business Week is a perfect time to reflect on your business success and move onward to an even brighter future. And if you’re an aspiring entrepreneur who wants to move past kicking the tires and start your own business, what better time to take your first steps?

*Image from the National Small Business Week website*