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5 Reasons Your Business Needs a Blog

More people are purchasing goods online than ever before, and adding blog content to your website helps capture the attention of digital shoppers and beyond. U.S. eCommerce sales in the second quarter of 2016 reached $97.3 billion, an increase of 4.5 percent quarter-over-quarter and a whopping 15.8 percent increase year-over-year, according to the Department of Commerce. When your company provides blog content your potential customers are searching for, you build trust in your business and increase positive sentiment about your brand, which leads to sales when blog visitors need your product or service.

Your competitors are already blogging. The Content Marketing Institute reports that 77 percent of businesses have a blog they use for content marketing, and the same percentage planned to produce more content in 2016 compared to 2015.

If you’re still on the fence about whether or not to add a blog to your marketing tool set, consider these five advantages.

1. A Blog Is Agile Marketing

Unlike ordering hundreds of T-shirts for a giveaway donning a logo that may change next week, or investing in banners and flyers that become useless and irrelevant when your next promotion is over, a blog is changeable in an instant with minimum cost to your marketing department. You can update it quickly with breaking news about your company and post trending content based on popular hashtags on Twitter. You can also create evergreen content for your audience, which can then be re-purposed into everything from eBooks and info-graphics to podcasts and webinars for years to come.

It’s also fairly easy to measure a blog’s effectiveness, so you can adjust your strategy accordingly. Compare that to spending big money on print materials, where performance is much more difficult to track. Content marketing expert and author Jay Baer presents an easy way to calculate blogging on his site, Convince & Convert. And by working with content creation and management software such as ClearVoice, you can scale your efforts more easily.

2. A Blog Boosts Search Engine Optimization

If your business sells a service or product that has dozens, hundreds or thousands of competitors, ranking higher in search results makes you more visible to those who are searching for your solution online. GE Capital Retail Bank reports more than 80 percent of shoppers who are making a major purchase conduct research online before deciding on a retailer. By tailoring blog content based on the content those shoppers are looking for, your brand is more likely to appear in their search results.

For example, if you’re a flooring installation company, and you discover your target customers are often searching, “Is carpet or hardwood better for my floors?”, you could create a blog post using that exact question as the title so that it shows up in results to that query.

Regularly creating new content — at least weekly is optimal — based on keywords that relate to your brand and what your target customers type into search engines provides a cue to search engine bots to continue to crawl your site and index your posts in their results. Featuring guest bloggers who link back to your blog on their own credible sites, creating content that is so valuable that other reputable sites link to it as a credible source, and guest blogging on other legitimate sites in exchange for a link back to your blog page mean your blog builds authority to search engines and boosts your entire website’s search engine optimization, which in turn benefits your product pages, too.

3. A Blog Increases Your Brand’s Exposure

In addition to gaining more traction on search engines by blogging, by producing content your web visitors will enjoy and feel compelled to share means your business is equipped with a powerful new arm in your marketing department: brand advocates. These content consumers share your blog on their social media pages, they email its content to their friends who need it, and they reference it when someone mentions a need for a product or service you offer.

While it is obviously relevant to include content on your blog that relates directly to your service or product, the better content strategy is to aim to be helpful, not sales-y. Blog content should educate, entertain and delight, so that it maintains attention and keeps visitors coming back for more.

By promoting blog content through your own social media channels, email newsletters, etc., you’re allowing it to be picked up and spread to completely new audiences by people they place confidence in. Since Nielsen reports 92 percent of people trust the recommendations of friends and family over all over forms of advertising, using a blog to engage your customers so much that they want to tell their friends about your business is of paramount value.

4. A Blog Establishes You as an Authority in Your Space

Speaking of trust, creating blog content that gives actionable advice to readers, video viewers or podcast listeners extends your reach beyond content creator to one of dependable expert.

Say you sell gluten-free flour. By producing content related to delicious gluten-free recipes, how to navigate ordering at a restaurant when you have celiac disease, and how to be a better baker with instructional cooking videos, you’re presenting content that benefits your current customers as well as those who haven’t bought it yet. You’re going to show up more in search results related to these topics, so you’ll reach new audiences — people who need your product but haven’t discovered you yet. Plus, you’ll gain return visitors who keep coming back to learn more about how to thrive in a gluten-free lifestyle.

Producing trustworthy, educational, useful content may also lead to significant publicity opportunities, such as guest spots on morning television news shows or being included as a source in a larger story. A blog legitimizes your leadership in your industry, since it allows you to become the site large audiences turn to when they want to learn about topics related to what you offer.

5. A Blog Connects You With Your Customers

Your competitors have blogs, and your customers love to read blogs. Blogging platform WordPress reports more than 409 million people view more than 22 billion blog pages per month. They read them while they’re at work, they read them while they’re waiting in a doctor’s office, and they read them on the subway. You have an audience who is thirsty for content.

By blogging, you not only provide them with knowledge or entertainment, you also build a relationship with your visitors. By integrating a commenting system, you can glean insights on the demographics of your readers. You can learn about their thoughts and opinions and what types of content or products they want from you. They can tell you what they’re loving about your brand and what they wish would be improved upon.

Get Going!

The possibilities of what your business can achieve by launching a blog are vast. A blog allows for real-time marketing, for you to improve your website’s and brand’s reach among current consumers and new prospects. A blog enables you to give helpful information to those who can turn into significant, loyal brand advocates for your business. With dozens of free blogging platforms to use and the power of content ideation within everything from your staff’s ideas to what people are talking about on your social media channels, getting started can bring more positive exposure to your business and improve your marketing efforts.

Image: Adobe Stock

Ready For Estimated Tax Payments?

When starting a business, you need to do quite a bit of heavy lifting. Of course, a big part of this is handling the complexities of the US tax system. In fact, one particular area that often trips up entrepreneurs is something called estimated tax payments.

The main reason is that this is quite different from when you have a job. You see, a self-employed person needs to essentially do what an employer does – that is, make ongoing payments to the IRS.

This often comes as a complete surprise to first-time entrepreneurs. After all, when April 15th rolls around, they usually get stuck with fees from the IRS for interest and penalties. But even worse, the overall tax bill can be hefty. As a result, you may have no choice but to take steps to resolve this, such as with an installment agreement (hey, the early days of a startup can be very lean).

So what do you need to know about estimated taxes? First of all, they include not only federal income tax but also the amounts for Social Security and Medicare. You’ll also need to make equal payments according to the following schedule:

April 15 (first quarter)
June 15 (second quarter)
September 15 (third quarter)
January 15 (fourth quarter)

Note: You may also have to pay estimated taxes for the state you are based in and the deadlines could be different (as is the case with California).

OK, there are some exceptions to being required to make estimated tax payments. They include:
• You expect to owe less than $1,000 for the year (whether as an individual, sole proprietor, member of an LLC or S-Corporation)
• You did not have to pay any taxes during the prior year
• You have a corporation where you expect to owe less than $500 for the year
• You are in an area that has suffered a natural disaster

Now, if you do not meet the above, you will need to follow either of these:
• You pay 100% of the tax you paid for last year (the percentage is 110% if your adjusted income is $150,000 or $75,000 if you are married and file separately) or
• You pay 90% of what you will ultimately owe for the current tax year.

And if you have a corporation, the requirement is that you pay the lesser of
• 100% of the tax you paid for the last year or
• 100% of what you will ultimately owe for the current year.

But as should be no surprise, coming up with the amounts can be tricky. In fact, you may ultimately pay way too much, which essentially means you are loaning money to the IRS! Because of this, you may want to use software like TurboTax or get the assistance of a tax professional.

And once you come up with the amount, the process of making the payment is straightforward. You can either file Form 1040-ES or Form 1120-W (for a corporation). But the easiest approach is to use the IRS’s Electronic Federal Tax Payment System.

The good news is that – once you get things setup – the process of handling estimated taxes should be smooth. But of course, the important thing is to make sure you make it a habit.

Image: Adobe Stock

By | September 20th, 2016|Business Filings, Running A Small Business, Taxes|0 Comments

Running Your Business: Do You Know What You Don’t Know?

With school back in session, students of all ages are learning new things—and discovering how much they don’t know in the process. Whether you’re an aspiring entrepreneur or long-time business owner, one thing is certain: like the kids who are back to school, you always have room to learn and grow.

As I’ve learned and grown as a business owner, one of my favorite phrases has become, “You don’t know what you don’t know.” How true, right? It’s far too easy to fool ourselves into thinking we really know all there is to know. But the truth is we will never ever know everything when it comes to starting and running a business, because things change all the time. We have to “school” ourselves. That means doing additional research and staying tuned in to new developments. The business climate, legal requirements, and technology constantly morph, sometimes subtly and sometimes significantly. If we don’t keep up with the various moving parts that affect us, our businesses could fall behind—or worse.

So I urge you to stay attentive and continue to learn about what’s new or what has changed with respect to:

  • Business structures, liability protection and filing requirements– for example, potential benefits of changing from a sole proprietorship or partnership to Corporation, an S-Corporation or a Limited Liability Company.
  • Tax laws and filing requirements – such as changes to the business tax rates, mileage reimbursement rates, valid tax deductions, filing deadlines etc.)
  • Corporate compliance requirements – such as annual reports, tax deadlines, permit and license filing due dates, etc.
  • Marketing tools, best practices, and regulations – like new social media platforms and automation tools, SEO, content marketing, the CAN-SPAM Act, etc.
  • HR issues – including employee benefits, hiring, firing, affirmative action, documentation requirements, etc.
  • Business technology – like cloud-based accounting software, CRMs (customer relationship management systems), virus and malware protection, mobile payment platforms, etc.

This is just the short list! Basically, anything related to entrepreneurship demands ongoing learning, because owning a business isn’t a static condition but rather a dynamic process. So as the kids strap on their backpacks this school season, prepare to gear up for your own journey in learning. Trust me, your homework will pay off!

Looking to start your own business? Remember, you don’t know what you don’t know—and we can help fix that. Download our free Starting A Business Checklist now! It’s a sure way to learn about what you need to do to get a successful business off the ground.

Image: Adobe Stock

Why You Need to Incorporate Your Business

When you think about incorporating your business, do you scoff, “Not me. I’m just a one-person/home-based/part-time business—incorporation is for the big guys”? If so, it’s time to rethink your attitude. You see, every small business—no matter how small or informal—needs to be incorporated.

That’s because no matter how small or informal your business is, you could be sued. Suppose your business isn’t doing well, you can’t pay a business debt and the creditor takes you to court to get their money back. Perhaps you are a children’s party planner, a child is injured during a birthday party you organize at a local park, and the parents decide to sue you. Or maybe you own a one-person accounting firm and, after you make a mistake on a client’s taxes that costs them a lot of money, they sue you for the damages.

In any of these cases, unless your business is incorporated, all of your personal assets could be at risk—including your savings, possessions and even your family home. And even if the lawsuit is baseless, you still have the legal costs involved in defending yourself in court.

If you haven’t done anything to determine a legal form for your business, and you are the only person in your business, by default you’re considered a sole proprietor. Even if you have a partner and the two of you have formed a general partnership, your personal assets still are not protected.

Why does incorporating provide so much protection? When you incorporate your business, you are creating a new legal entity that’s separate from its owners. If your corporation owes a debt or if it is sued, the business—not you personally—is liable.

Incorporating has several other advantages:
• It makes it easier to separate your business and personal finances, which has tax advantages.
• It helps you establish a credit score for your business so you don’t have to rely on your personal credit score.
• If you think you might ever need to get a business loan or look for investors to help finance your business, being incorporated will help there, too.
• Being able to put “Inc.” or “LLC” after your business name just looks more professional, which can make customers and clients feel more confident doing business with you.

There are several different forms your business can take when incorporating: a C corporation, an S corporation, or an LLC (limited liability company). Here’s a quick overview of the differences:
• C corporation: A C corporation pays federal income taxes. However, any dividends paid to the owner (or other shareholders) are also taxed. This is sometimes called “double taxation,” and the S corporation form was created to help avoid it.
• S corporation: An S corporation doesn’t pay federal income taxes. Any income or financial losses pass through to the owner and get reported on his or her personal tax returns.
• LLC: Limited Liability Companies have a more flexible management structure than C or S corporations, while still protecting your personal assets. Any profits or losses from the business will be reported on your personal tax return.

There are some costs associated with incorporation, as well as some paperwork you’ll need to complete every year. However, when you consider the risk to your personal finances that could arise from not incorporating, the cost is well worth it.

Find out more about corporation business structures.

To take advantage of all these perks, incorporate your business with CorpNet today! Call us for a

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Filing a DBA – FAQ

This month in our FAQ series, we tackle the most commonly asked questions about one of the most popular entity types – the DBA.

Starting a business can be overwhelming, and one of the first and most important steps is choosing a business entity. A DBA, which stands for “Doing Business As”, is also known as a fictitious business name or assumed business name. A sole proprietor can file a DBA in order to operate under their preferred business name, or a DBA can be filed underneath an existing corporation or LLC in order to advertise as or accept payments under an alternative name. Below are some of the most common questions and answers our CEO Nellie Akalp receives regarding the DBA:

Q: If I’m a sole proprietor, do I need to file a DBA?

A: It depends. If you are operating your business as a sole proprietor, you’ll need to file a DBA to operate your business with a name that’s different than your own personal legal name or last name. For example, if you want to start a gardening business with the name “Spring Flowers Landscaping” then you’ll need to file a DBA to be able to use that name.

But if you’re a sole proprietor and are going to use your own personal legal name or last name for your business, then a DBA isn’t necessary. In addition, you don’t need to file a DBA to use a business name that includes your surname and a combination of words that accurately describes your business. For example, if your name is Jane Doe and you have a landscaping business, you do not need a DBA to call your business “Doe’s Landscaping.”

Q: If my business is structured as an LLC or Corporation, do I need a DBA?

A: If you filed to become a corporation or LLC, then you’ve already registered your business name with the state and don’t need a DBA to use the official name on the filing paperwork. However, you do need to file a DBA to use any variations from the official name on your LLC/incorporation paperwork.

Q: When do I need to file my DBA?

A: You shouldn’t conduct any business under a fictitious business name until filing a DBA for that name. Most banks typically won’t let you open a business bank account (and accept checks to your fictitious business name) until you have filed for a DBA.

Q: Is there a difference “fictitious business name” and Doing Business As (DBA)?

A: No. Fictitious business name, DBA, and assumed business name all mean the same thing.

Q: If I file for a DBA, does this prevent others from using my business name?

A: No. In most states, a DBA doesn’t guarantee exclusive rights to a name. When you file for an LLC or corporation, this can give you exclusive rights in your own state. You can also file for a trademark to guarantee exclusive rights to the name within your line of business in all 50 states.

Do you need help filing a DBA or have a question about another aspect of starting a business? Call the CorpNet.com team today for a free business consultation at: 888.449.2638

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My Labor Day Challenge To Entrepreneurs

As most people gear up for the Labor Day weekend—preparing to grill burgers, mix cocktails, and enjoy some downtime—I know some of you entrepreneurs will find it difficult to step away from your businesses. Yes, I too have been there. But on my journey, I’ve learned that while Labor Day was created to honor the contributions of workers, it doesn’t mean you should “celebrate” by working on the holiday. There truly is a time for work—and a time for play!

My Labor Day challenge to all business owners out there is to make a conscious effort to enjoy the holiday with family and friends. As difficult as it may be, set your mind to leaving your cares centered on starting and running your business behind for the day. Giving yourself a break—a real, no-nonsense break—brings many benefits. And it’s highly unlikely (for most types of businesses, anyway) that taking the day off will impair your business success.

My Labor Day Challenge To You
• Don’t turn on your laptop or tablet.
• Plan something fun to do with the people you love spending time with.
• Put your smartphone away—except to snap selfies with your significant other, your kiddos, your friends, and your pets.
• Pause to think about how wonderful it is to be carefree for a while.

The Perks Of Not Laboring On Labor Day
• Clears your mind – Which can improve your focus when you go back to work.
Alleviates your stress – Mentally and physically.
• Reconnects you with the people you care about. – Without work-related distractions, you’ll be able to more fully concentrate and engage in quality conversations.

I realize it might be difficult for you to push work aside, but resist the urge to succumb to the lure of sneaking in an email or checking your business social media on Labor Day. You’ve labored plenty to start your business and run your company. You deserve this day of rest and relaxation!

Happy Labor Day to all you hard-working entrepreneurs! Want to simplify your business filing and compliance efforts and enjoy more time doing the things you love EVERY day? Sign up for CorpNet B.I.Z., and never miss another filing deadline.

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By | September 1st, 2016|Business Operations, Running A Small Business|0 Comments

How to get an LLC License

Here at CorpNet, we are often asked how to form an LLC, also referred to as a Limited Liability Company, when wanting to start a business.

To be clear, an LLC is not a business license; as one cannot obtain an LLC license.

A Limited Liability Company (LLC) is a legal entity that bears similarities to both corporations and partnerships. An LLC is formed under specific state statutes that provide for the creation and regulation of this special type of entity that has come to be commonly used and respected in business.

An LLC can be used to combine the limited liability features of a corporation with the flexibility and tax benefits of a partnership. Owners of an LLC are generally known as “members.” Management and control of the entity resides with the members, unless otherwise provided in the articles of organization of the LLC or within the LLC operating agreement.

An LLC provides the same personal asset protection with fewer hoops to jump through. You can also raise capital with an LLC. Additionally, with an LLC, you can:

● File your business LLC taxes on your personal tax return
● Allocate profit and loss to members of the LLC
● Avoid having to have an annual shareholders’ meeting (unlike a corporation)

New small business owners often assume that forming an LLC is a complicated thing. It’s not, actually, but it is one of the best things you can do to protect your personal assets and your business.

Here are 7 steps to follow as to how to register your new business by filing an LLC application within your state:

1. Choose a Name.
Your name will be the first thing people see or hear as it relates to your new business, so make it a good one! Next, you’ll want to make sure you’re the only one using that name. You can do that with a free corporate name search in your state.

2. Register the LLC and File Your Paperwork
If you’re doing the filing yourself, you’ll need to download your state’s Articles of Organization paperwork and fill it out. If you’re letting a document filing service like CorpNet handle it; you’ll just need to provide basic contact information and a few details about your company.

3. Get Your LLC’s Tax ID
Before you can start operating as an LLC, you need an Employer Identification Number. This is like a social security number for your business, and one you’ll need before opening a business bank account.

4. Create Your Operating Agreement
This document outlines the rights and obligations of the members of your LLC and lists the distribution of income of the Limited Liability Company to its members. Your LLC Operating Agreement won’t need to be filed with your state, but you will need to keep one on premises, signed, if you have other shareholders.

5. File Business Licenses and Permits
Additionally, you should apply for any business licenses or permits you’ll need to operate your business. It’s best to do this before you start operating your business to avoid potential fees or issues down the road.

6. Keep Your LLC Compliant
Once you’re operating as an LLC, your work isn’t done for good. Each year, you’ll need to file your annual report. The due date for this annual report depends on where you filed your LLC. For example, if you filed it in Michigan, Delaware, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, or Texas, there’s a specific date that your annual report is due. In most other states, it’s due on the anniversary of when your LLC was filed.

7. Finally, Take Care of Loose Ends
Depending on where you’re based, you may need to publish your intent to form an LLC in a local newspaper. If you form an LLC in New York, for example, you’re required to run that intent in an approved newspaper for 6 consecutive weeks.

Many of our customers prefer the LLC over the S Corporation because they require fewer formalities and less paperwork than the corporation, while still providing that protection of your personal assets, as well as tax benefits. Contact CorpNet.com today and let us help you file your LLC application and make your business reams into a reality!

Image: Adobe Stock

Nellie in the News: August 2016

August has come and gone and in just a few days it will be September! That mean’s fall is just around the corner and kids are back in school. With kids back in school, some of you may be getting back to business! We’re standing by ready to help you incorporate a business, form an LLC, file a DBA and more across all 50 states.

This past month was filled with some fantastic articles, speaking engagements and press mentions from our CEO Nellie Akalp. Here are some highlights from August and some upcoming speaking appearances where you can see Nellie in person.

Want Nellie to speak at your next event or share her tips on your podcast? Contact her today

Upcoming Speaking Appearances

Women’s Business Expo by the City of Duarte

Nellie is the featured speaker sharing her insight for other women entrepreneurs.

September 10, 2016

More info: http://bit.ly/2bFLUhQ

Interviews & press Mentions

CIO – 12 Tips for Creating a Must-Read Business Blog http://bit.ly/2aqcTyK

Monster.com – Business Startup Checklist: Steps to Success http://mnstr.me/2b8TuCk

Lifetime Cashflow Podcast – Entrepreneur Nellie Akalp http://apple.co/2b3kI0I

Small Business Trends – Cybercrime Security eBook http://bit.ly/2aP0CE0

Small Business Advocate Radio – Who Owns Your Intellectual Property As An Employee? http://bit.ly/2aUqBIc

Small Business Advocate Radio – Legal Steps Involved when Closing a Business http://bit.ly/2aUrjVX

Successful Meetings – Strategies to Reduce Summer Stress http://bit.ly/2aVNqS0

Temple City Tribune – Duarte Chamber Spearheads Women’s Business Expo http://bit.ly/2bFLUhQ

Expert Contributed Posts

Small Business Trends – Should I File an Intent to Use Trademark Application? http://bit.ly/2akZF97

Huffington Post – 5 Signs You’re Standing in The Way of Your Own Business’ Success http://huff.to/2b8cjGz

Accounting Today – Should You Structure Your Accounting Firm as an LLC, PLLC or PC? http://bit.ly/2aJL4Qe

AllBusiness – Entrepreneurship and Business Depends on Social Unity http://bit.ly/2aUm3lt

Freshbooks – What’s The Best State to Incorporate Your Business In? http://bit.ly/2bHBbs6

GoDaddy – Foreign Qualification Basics If You’re Running a Business in Multiple States http://bit.ly/2bDOfeP

By | August 30th, 2016|Uncategorized|2 Comments

5 Tech Trends Shaking Up Small Business in 2016

In this digital era, small businesses now have access to a wealth of tools they’ve never had access to before.  Even small startups are now able to compete in local and global markets at levels previously limited to enterprise companies. New marketing techniques, payment methods, inventory management tools, and development tools – all of these are being made possible by rapid changes in technology. And small businesses are the ones who are winning. Below are the top five trends you should keep an eye out for during the rest of the year.

EMV Chip Technology

Now that security is at the top of the minds of most consumers, EMV chip technology is gaining popularity as these chips make it difficult for malicious individuals to create fake payment cards. Traditional credit cards use magnetic strips which contain unchanging information. When an attacker gains access to the information, they’re easily able to clone the cards and use it for malicious purposes. EMV chips on the other hand generate codes for each transaction. If an attacker were to gain access to these databases, they wouldn’t be able to use the codes for future purchases.

Since EMV technology is fairly new, most small businesses need to overhaul their credit card processing software and terminals with modern versions which support reading the chips.  

Ecommerce Business

Now that many point of sale (POS) systems have ecommerce support built-in, small businesses are able to leverage the best of both digital and in-store customers, leading to greater sales.  Popup shops for example, enable small businesses to test new revenue streams, engage with customers offline, improve brand awareness, and also educate new customers on product offerings. At the end of the season sales don’t have to stop because your online properties can stay open throughout the year.

Analytics Tools

Business analytics tools are becoming increasingly popular. While they were mostly considered useful for large corporations, small businesses are beginning to realize the value of real-time data and use analytics tools. Why? Because analytics tools help small businesses see what they’re doing wrong, what’s working for them, and how to improve. There are many tools for different aspects of your business such as social media, email, and marketing campaigns. Most popular of these tools is Google Analytics. By allowing all your data to converge on one platform, small businesses can now leverage their new found information to make informed decisions.

Inventory Management Software

Inventory management is one of the biggest challenges small businesses face because they often don’t have the ability to dedicate individuals to handle the tasks. This often results in wasted stock and lost goods. Fortunately, modern inventory management software makes it easier than ever for small business to keep track of inventory simply by scanning barcodes and then having the data digitally logged into their systems.

Mobile Applications

Although they used to be limited to larger companies, many small businesses are beginning to launch their own mobile apps. Tools such as the Microsoft PowerApps tool are making it easy for virtually anyone to create their own apps regardless of technical expertise. In many cases the advanced technologies behind applications are enabling businesses to embed click-to-call voice and video communications capabilities within their code. This means you can seamlessly integrate video chat into your apps as a new way to communicate with your customers and enhance the overall experience.

Looking Ahead

Although all these trends are fairly notable, this list is far from comprehensive. Technology is always evolving and there’s so much innovation going on that it’s impossible to list everything here. The best way to keep pace with these shifts and changes is to ensure you’re always open to learning new things. By reading up on industry trends and having the flexibility to try new things within your business, you’ll be able to make the most of the modern systems out there.

With the latest technology tools in place, it’s a good time to revisit your business structure. Call CorpNet.com today for a free business consultation to incorporate a business, form an LLC, file a DBA and more! 888.449.2638

Charles Costa is a writer and marketing analyst for Fit Small Business and other publications. He focuses on helping companies grow, one word at a time. His areas of expertise include software, hardware, biotech, finance and general technology. You can learn more about him at CharlesCosta.net.

Image: Adobe Stock