Some studies estimate that the cost of hiring someone is approximately six to nine months’ of their salary. An employee making on average $40,000 might cost $20,000 or more to find if you factor in the time to recruit, screen, hire and train new employees. With so much on the line for finding a great candidate, it’s critically important to do your best to screen potential employees as rigorously as possible.

Weeding out those who aren’t qualified is easy, but screening the final group for the star performer in the mix is difficult. These three filters to add to your interview process can help.

 

Three Filters to Add to Your Interview Process

The typical hiring process includes:

  • Creating (or updating) a job description for the vacant position.
  • Writing and placing a help wanted ad.
  • Receiving resumes.
  • Screening resumes.
  • Telephone interviews to screen candidates.
  • In-person interviews with the best candidates.
  • An offer and someone hired.

Keep in mind, that selecting the right job boards to find employees online is important to your hiring process as well. Of course, at any point in the process, you may add steps or people, which lengthens the process but helps hire better candidates. Many companies now ask that a potential employee’s manager, coworkers and subordinates interview candidates so that they can assess how well candidates get along with people throughout the organization.

Adding the following three steps to your interviewing process won’t slow it down too much, but it will help you narrow down the candidate pool to the best-qualified applicants. This will actually save you time later since there will be fewer resumes to review and consider.

 

#1 Enhanced Job Description

When you start with a specific, enhanced and updated job description, you already start the process of being specific and choosy with your applicants. A highly-specific job description immediately attracts only those with such specific skills, while turning away others who do not possess them. The enhanced job description should detail every aspect of the position, including educational and experience requirements, specialized skills, and more. Take this information and include it in your job posting to encourage candidates with the best fit of skills to respond. When you are posting to job sites, the enhanced position description will make it easier to set up your job posting so that only the best-qualified will respond. This significantly cuts down on the number of unqualified candidates who apply, and saves you a great deal of time reviewing resumes.

 

#2 Pre-Employment Survey

After you receive resumes and cover letters from the initial job postings, it’s helpful to ask the most promising candidates to take a brief survey. You can ask them after the telephone interview or before it via an emailed response to their application. You can even add it to the application itself, before they even submit their resume. The survey can be created on a site like Survey Monkey to make it easier to collect the information. Ask questions pertinent to the job you’re hiring for, and make them specific so that it is difficult to fudge the answers. Provide scenario-based questions to see how potential employees would handle difficult situations, or ask questions that only someone with the right skill set can answer. The survey shouldn’t take too long to complete, but it will yield insights into the candidate’s’ qualifications and knowledge, so that you can save yourself time by scheduling telephone interviews with only the most promising candidates.

 

#3 Give homework.

A paid test assignment, or a homework assignment of some sort, is the final task that many employers can add to find great candidates. If you’re hiring freelancers, always offer compensation for their time completing a paid test assignment; many professionals won’t touch a free assignment even if the actual gig is promising. The test assignment can be a small sample of a larger project that the candidate would be expected to complete if actually hired for the job.

For full-time employees, a simple ‘homework’ assignment demonstrates several things. First, it shows you how committed and interested they are in the job. Next, it provides proof of their ability to complete work independently. Lastly, it provides you with insight into how well they can meet deadlines. These are three tasks that are difficult to assess from a resume but critical for job success.

See how the candidate responds to the test assignment. Those who are eager for the job will respond positively. Also listen for how well they negotiate deadlines and the questions asked about the assignment. This yields important clues about their work habits, ability to understand direction, and interest in the position.

 

Don’t Settle for Second-Best

It’s tempting to rush the hiring process along. A vacancy means lost productivity and extra work for your current team. However, rushing the hiring process never yields the best candidate. Take your time to find the best fit for your business and your business will prosper.

                               

Summary
Article Name
Hiring the Best Candidates: 3 Filters to Add to Your Interview Process
Description
Use these three tips to help find the best candidate for your business.
Author
CorpNet.com