/Other

Start & Run Your Business Right: Join Our Facebook Group and Partner Program

The process of starting a business is both thrilling and intimidating. There’s the exhilaration that comes from working through the details and making the dream a reality. And then, there are the business formation options and ongoing compliance requirements that often raise questions and sometimes cause confusion.

That’s why I’m hosting the “Business Formations & Compliance” Facebook group.

The group is a place where business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs can get insight on anything related to forming a business and complying with the rules to keep it in good standing. You can join for free, so there’s no reason not to take advantage of the expertise you’ll find there!

What Can You Expect?

We’ll cover a breadth of topics related to starting and maintaining a business that complies with federal and state requirements.

A few examples include:

  • Filing a DBA
  • Forming an LLC with an S Corp election
  • Incorporating as a C Corporation
  • Annual report obligations
  • Corporate minutes
  • Business name searches
  • Trademark filings

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. No matter what filing requirements you need more information about, I’ll be there to answer the questions you and other group members post.

You can also meet up with me on Facebook Live Fridays when I’m available in real time to offer tips and insight.

Also New: The CorpNet Partner Program

CorpNet has launched a Partner Program for accountants, bookkeepers, attorneys, business advisors, and other service professionals that wish to give their clients additional value. As our Partner, you can offer formation and compliance services to your customers—with all fulfillment and liability handled by CorpNet. Sign up for free today! Besides strengthening your client relationships, you’ll also get 50 percent of the profits from any formation and compliance services that you sell.*

Seize The Possibilities!

Join the Business Formations & Compliance Facebook group and check out our CorpNet Partner Program. Bringing insight, education, and the potential for additional income, these platforms offer opportunities for empowerment and growth.

*50% commission is based on our gross revenue – minus costs. The 50% profit sharing for partners is a limited offering for early birds. Please sign up now to be grandfathered and start earning right away.

How to Use a Blog to Boost Your Business

Nowadays, a business website is considered incomplete if it doesn’t have a blog. Blogging started out as a mere hobby, an online journal where individuals would share their thoughts, feelings, experiences and opinions. However, businesses have found that blogging is also a valuable resource for lead generation, customer service, boosting search engine rankings, and brand marketing and promotion.

Today we give you a number of ways starting your own business blog could give your business a much needed boost in the right direction.

1. Get More Online Exposure

Businesses devote entire departments to marketing, where the only goal is to constantly think of the next big promotion, event, or advertisement that can lure customers in. Nowadays, instead of investing money in other online marketing tactics, more companies are opting for the creating a company blog.

According to a recent study, company websites with blogs get 55% more traffic, with 37% of marketers saying that blogging is the most important type of content marketing. A company blog, as long as it is carefully maintained, can be an infinite source of leads for the company. Engaging content will bring in interested viewers, who will then share your blog posts to other people who might need them. Free advertising at its best!

2. Cement Your Reputation as an Industry Professional

Customers are more likely to give you their hard-earned money if they can see that you, as a company, know what you’re talking about. Blogs are a great way to disseminate important information that your target audience might find useful. For example, if your company is a provider of loans, having a few articles on how to save money, raise one’s credit score and ensure loan application success gives off the impression that your company is knowledgeable in all matters concerning your field.

3. Promote More Customer Interaction

Before, customers could only reach a company through phone, or email. Customers felt that businesses were distant and uncaring of their needs. Blogging is a great way to close the gap between consumers and businesses. At the end of every blog post, consumers can share their thoughts about the post and the company as a whole through the comments section.

Businesses can place someone in charge of answering these comments to encourage interaction. This makes businesses seem more “human” in the eyes of a consumer, which helps convert leads. Existing customers are more loyal to companies who will take note of their suggestions and make changes in the company accordingly.

4. Boost Search Engine Rankings

Blogs make business websites appealing not only to visitors, but to search engines as well. Imagine, each blog you write is a separate page that can be indexed, giving you more chances of being found on search engines. Around 5-7 billion searches are made by people each day. Now imagine if even a small fraction of these people find their way to your website. Let’s say your company sells dietary products online and you have several blog articles on dieting. So the next time someone searches for “common diet myths” for example, if you have a blog post on diet myths, your blog post has a chance of showing up on the search engine results. The more blog posts you have, the more likely you’ll have something that someone out there is searching for.

Google’s algorithm keeps changing, but some of their basic rules don’t change. Search engines like Google favor pages with longer content (around 1,140-1,285) and value viewer retention more than number of views. So it matters less how many people view a certain page, and more how long they stay engaged with that page. Blog posts with interesting content, especially those with images and videos embedded on them, can sustain the interest of viewers for several minutes.

5. Get Extra Income For Your Company

While the main purpose of company blogs is to attract new customers, interact with old ones, convert viewership to sales and boost brand reputation, there’s nothing wrong with making a little bit of money on the side. There are a variety of ways for you to monetize your company blog, from well-placed ads to affiliate marketing. Affiliate marketing is basically earning commission for referring another business. For example, if your business provides renovation and repair services, you can apply as an affiliate for manufacturers of construction materials and fixtures. Then, on your company’s blog, you can write a review on these manufacturers, linking to their website in the process. Every time a viewer clicks on the link and makes a purchase, you make a commission from it.

Conclusion

Blogging can greatly affect a company’s reputation, online exposure, customer service, and income generation, making it a powerful tool that is accessible even to smaller and newer businesses. Being new and having fewer resources is no excuse to ignore the benefits of blogging. In fact, business with blogs experience 126% more lead growth compared to businesses without a blog. Who knows, blogging might just be the key to transforming your virtually unknown business into a thriving, influential powerhouse.

Best Practices For Interviewing Job Candidates

Hiring the right people requires a sure-fire interviewing process. To effectively interview prospective employees, you need more than a little dedicated time and a list of questions; you need an understanding of how you can draw out the information you need about an individual’s knowledge and capabilities. You also need to tune into character nuances that might indicate how well a candidate will work with your team. And, of course, you need to do all of that without breaking any anti-discrimination laws.

Interviewing can be intimidating for not only prospective employees, but also for employers! By following some best practices for interviewing applicants, you can better ensure your interview process does the job well, allowing you to home in on that one individual who will be an exceptional fit for the position.

Get The Job Done Right: 6 Best Practices For Interviewing Job Candidates

  • Prepare.

Whether you alone will interview the job candidate or you decide to have multiple interviewers, everyone involved should prepare in advance.

Interviewers should know what experience, capabilities, and professional characteristics are critical to the job (it helps to rank them in order of most important to least important), so everyone is on the same page when assessing job candidates. Also, each interviewer needs to understand her role in the interview and have questions prepared that will draw out relevant information about the job candidate’s knowledge, skills, and experience. To do this, you all need to be intimately familiar with the job position’s requirements and the information a job candidate provided thus far (job application, resume, phone interview, etc.) that has awarded her an in-person interview.

  • Make It As Less Stressful As Possible.

To get things off to the best start, be on time. Making an on-time candidate wait around for you and other interviewers to finish up phone calls or run for coffee at the last minute will send the wrong impression and add to any nervousness she’s already feeling. Begin the interview on a friendly note with some casual small talk to make the job candidate feel comfortable and at ease. When excessively nervous, even an individual who is fully capable and competent will lose the ability to put her best foot forward in an interview. I would never want to count anyone out simply because of interview jitters. I’ve always found that breaking the ice with some light-hearted, easy-going conversation helps everyone relax and sets the stage for a productive exchange of information.

Also, set aside enough time for the interview so you aren’t rushing through it. If you’re constantly checking the clock, you won’t be concentrating as fully as you should be on the interview. Your applicant will sense that and may not answer questions in adequate detail because she doesn’t want to impose on your time.

  • Comply With The Law 

Federal and state anti-discrimination laws exist to protect applicants from biases of age, sex, race, color, national origin, religion, genetics, or disabilities. Everyone involved in the interviewing and hiring process should understand which job interview questions are acceptable to ask and the job interview questions that are illegal. Use questions that are focused on drawing out information about your interviewee’s skills, knowledge, and experience relevant to the job. That will help you avoid inquiring about personal situations and lifestyle preferences, which could raise suspicions of discrimination if a candidate isn’t hired.

  • Ask Questions That Allow The Job Candidate To Do The Talking.

The best way to learn more about a prospective employee’s capabilities, attitude, and professional style is to let her have the floor. Consider asking open-ended questions that solicit a more detailed answer than just “yes” or “no.” Also consider including questions that ask applicants to share about some past on-the-job experiences and hypothetical situations. These can help shed light on how well a candidate might deal with certain circumstances and challenges on the job.

Some examples of questions that might draw out meaningful responses include:

  • What interests you most about working for our company?
  • What did you like most about your most recent position with your former employer?
  • Describe a time when you had to share unwelcome but necessary news with a customer.
  • Tell us about when your presentation skills helped change someone’s preconceived ideas about something. How did you prepare for the challenge?
  • Suppose you were recently hired as a manager at a local restaurant. Every week, a certain customer comes in for lunch. And every week, that customer asks to talk to you to complain about the wait time, the server, or the food. How would you deal with this customer?

These types of open questions can help you gauge a job candidate’s communication abilities, problem solving skills, and professionalism. They will also help you get a sense for how an applicant may react under certain circumstances and how well she might adapt to your company’s culture.

  • Listen Well And Take Good Notes.

Minimize distractions so your attention doesn’t wander to other things while you’re conducting an interview. As your applicant is answering your questions, be fully present mentally when listening. And take notes. You may think your memory is good, but it’s probably not going to live up to your expectations! You’ll want to capture what you liked and didn’t like about how the job candidate responded to you. After interviewing multiple candidates, you’ll have your notes to refer back to as you assess each individual and decide whom you want to ask back to attend subsequent interviews.

  • Give The Job Candidate An Opportunity To Ask Questions

Remember, the interview process is also to help qualified candidates learn whether a position might be right for them. Be sure to provide ample opportunity for them to ask questions about the job responsibilities, your company’s policies, and the working environment at your company.

Interviewing, when done effectively, will reveal a lot about an applicant’s skills, experience, knowledge, and interpersonal skills. With proper planning and attention to the best practices I’ve shared here, your interviews can help ensure you hire the most suitable person for the job. For further guidance and to make sure you comply with all the legal requirements (thus avoiding a job discrimination lawsuit), consider enlisting the help of a human resources expert and/or attorney.  Doing it right from the start can save you time, headaches, and employee turnover and training costs.

7 Small Business Expenses to Account for in Your Monthly Budget

Budgets are essential to manage your costs and keep your small business profitable throughout the year. Due to the dynamic nature of any small business, you can’t just set a budget in January and let it sit unchanged until the end of the year. Every month, take stock of your business’ performance and expenses and use that data from the prior month to update your budget.

Your monthly budget needs to provide you with enough detail so that you can identify potential cash crunches in the near future as well as opportunities to make the most out of extra cash. To get that level of detail, let’s review seven key small business expenses to account for in your monthly budget.

1. Vehicle Expenses

With the tax deadline rapidly approaching, you may now know that you’ll be able to deduct vehicle expenses for business purposes. Go beyond just the number of dollars spent for gas and include applicable vehicle registration fees, repairs, and insurance payments. Also, keep track of business miles driven because you can deduct 53.5 cents per mile in 2017. For more details, consult Topic 510 from the IRS.

2. Advertising Expenses

Depending on your marketing budget and number of promotion projects that you have going on, you could be eating up your ad budget too fast (or even, too slow). Reconciling your monthly payments to advertisers allows you to fine tune your promotion efforts so that you have enough left for those peak periods, such as the summer or December holidays.

3. Tax Payments

Dude, where’s the budget for April? Your tax liability might have taken a big bite out of it, hurting your available cash on hand to pay suppliers and (gasp!) employees that month. Including all outgoing cash flows is a key part of building a budget for your small business, and tax payments are no exception.

4. Wages

As your small business grows, you’ll find yourself wishing that you could hire an extra help of hands to handle the extra work. But is it worth to have full-time staff throughout the entire year? By keeping track of wages every month, you’ll be able to determine if you could be better served by part-time, seasonal, or contract workers on specific months. Plus, it helps you to be ready for Form 941 every quarter and its equivalent at the state level, if applicable.

5. Expenses Related to Accounts Receivable

Your budget may have a category tracking one-time (or unusual) expenses. From that list, single out any charges for collecting money for sales made on credit, or write-offs from money that’s never recovered. Such charges will tell you the whole story about your sales numbers and whether or not you need to make changes to your policies for sales made on credit.

6. Cash Outflows from Operating Activities

When doing a cash flow analysis, you want to break down cash inflows and outflows into operating, financing, and investment activities. Get in the habit of reconciling your cash flow balance by adding and subtracting applicable inflows, such as depreciation and decrease in inventory, and outflows from operating activities, such as increase in accounts receivable and decrease in accounts payable, and you’ll have an indicator of potential cash crunches or opportunities for investment.

A number that’s too low for many months would indicate that you should start looking into forms of business financing and one that’s too high for many months would point out that your small business could afford to invest in a new piece of equipment, hire a new employee, or spend a bit more in promotion.

7. Loan Advances

If you have an existing term loan or line of working capital, write down how much you have used on the previous month. This allows you to evaluate your existing form of financing: Are you tapping into your line of credit only during certain months? Do you have adequate reserves for an emergency? Do you need to increase your limit?
As you can see, monitoring your business expenses is a great financial habit that allows you to make more informed decisions and reach your business goals. Depending on the size of your small business, hiring a bookkeeper to maintain your monthly budget and other financial documents, such as income statement and balance sheet, will free up your time and enable you to focus on the core activities of your operation.

Should Your Company Use a PEO?

Small business owners may be new to the world of PEOs, or professional employer organizations, but these companies have been around now for several years and changing the face of human resources management.

A PEO provides comprehensive outsourcing for all tasks and functions typically performed by an in-house human resources department. This may include employee job descriptions, benefits, payroll, insurance, and regulatory requirements.

PEOs act as a ‘co-employer’ with your company so that they share contractual obligations with your employees. Management decisions, however, remain with your company. You continue to guide the daily job duties and responsibilities of your employees while the PEO manages their benefits administration and related tasks.

According to the National Association of Professional Employer Organizations (NAPEO), small businesses that work with a PEO grow 70 to 9 percent faster, experience 10 to 14 percent less employee turnover, and are 50 percent less likely to go out of business. Although these sounds like terrific benefits for any small business owner, there are also some drawbacks to working with a PEO. Here, we discuss both the pros and cons of working with a PEO so that as a small business owner, you can make an informed choice before taking the next step and contacting PEOs.

The Benefits of Working with a PEO

There are many benefits of working with a PEO for a small business.

  • Saving Time:  Working with a PEO can save you considerable time. SCORE reports that 25 to 35% of a small business owner’s time is spent handling HR-related tasks, with 7 to 25% of that time alone spent on paperwork.  A business owner’s time is precious and the more time that can be spent on tasks to grow a business and increase revenues, the better. Every minute spent on paperwork decreases the amount of time you can spend growing and running your business.
  • Avoid penalties and fines: Tax laws continue to evolve into complex tangles that can be difficult for the average business owner to unravel. Missing deadlines or paperwork can lead to penalties and fines from the IRS, state or federal agencies. A PEO is skilled at handling all types of HR paperwork and takes the responsibility from your shoulders of managing deadlines, filing periods, and paperwork. It becomes their responsibility so you will not incur fines if problems arise.
  • Improved employee retention: Because the PEO handles questions regarding benefits, there’s always someone available to help your team understand their benefits and work through any questions or problems. Additionally, a PEO can find better employee benefits and draw upon their industry contacts and resources to improve the benefits package you can offer to your employees. This tends to increase job satisfaction and makes your company more appealing to work with, leading to better employee retention rates.

Drawbacks of Working with a PEO

There are also some drawbacks to working with a PEO that you should be aware of before embarking on a co-employment relationship. These drawbacks include:

  • Lack of control: The PEO manages all aspects of the HR department include health insurance coverage and other important benefits. They can, at their discretion, offer new policies or coverage to your employees. Sometimes this works out for the best since they can tap into their resources and can often gain better coverage than you can on your own. But this lack of control can be disturbing to a business owner used to retaining total control over all aspects of his business.
  • Impersonal service: All questions about HR and benefits are now handled by the PEO. Employees must call a hotline or 800-number instead of stopping by the HR department in your company. This may feel distant and unfriendly to some used to the former method of getting help for their questions. It does add a layer to your organization that may not be comfortable working through at first
  • Monetary risk:  Most PEO contracts require that their fees are paid in advance before work begins. If the PEO goes out of business or is sold to another company and you are unhappy about the new company, you may be out of luck and unable to break the contract. Choosing a stable, well-known PEO with a history of successful work helps mitigate this risk.

Is a PEO Right for Your Company?

A PEO arrangement can offer significant benefits to a small business, but they aren’t for everyone. Companies with less than five employees may not be able to find a PEO willing to work with them; the average contract size with a PEO is for five or more employees.  

Working with a PEO will cost your organization anywhere from $500 to $1,500 per employee. You may be able to handle your employee benefits administration and other HR tasks at a more cost-effective rate internally than by working with a PEO.

As the world of HR and benefits grows increasingly complex, small business owners may continue to turn to PEOs for help. But if you’re just looking for help with payroll or taxes, there are self-service options such as payroll software that may be a better option.

If you’d like to start looking for a PEO, consider this comparison of several services that offers insight into costs and features. And you may also want to file the link away for future reference, since as your business grows, so too will the number of employees needing benefits and other HR support. If a PEO isn’t right for you now, we hope you grow so big that you’ll need one someday!

By | March 22nd, 2017|Business Operations, Business Tools, Other|0 Comments

S Corporation Election Deadline Is Almost Here: What Startups And Existing Businesses Need To Know

If you’ve legally established your business as a C Corporation or Limited Liability Company (LLC) that has elected to be viewed as a corporation for tax purposes, you have the option of filing IRS Form 2553 to get S Corporation tax treatment.

Why would you want to do so, you ask? Because it could make a big impact on your business’s bottom line.

The Potential Advantage for LLCs

LLC owners who find themselves with a high self-employment tax burden might benefit from choosing the S Corp election. LLCs are normally taxed like sole proprietorships—with all business profits subject to self-employment taxes. With S Corp tax treatment, self-employment taxes are only applied to wages and salaries rather than on all business profits.

The Potential Advantage for C Corporations

C Corporations can benefit from S Corp election because it avoids the costly double taxation C Corps normally face.

As a completely separate entity from its owners, a C Corp essentially pays taxes twice on its income:

1) When the corporation makes money, it files a tax return and pays taxes on those profits, and

2) If the corporation distributes profits to shareholders, those distributions get taxed again on the shareholders’ personal tax returns.

If a C Corporation opts to be treated as an S Corp for tax purposes, however, the business itself doesn’t file its own taxes. Instead, shareholders report their individual shares of the business’s profits and losses on their own personal tax returns.

For instance, if you’re an S Corporation shareholder with 50 percent ownership of the business, you would pay taxes on 50 percent of the profits. That income would be taxed as a profit distribution, and you might get a favorable tax rate. Note that you would also pay taxes on any income you received as wages and salaries (and that portion of your income would be subject to self-employment taxes).

Ultimately, the advantage of filing for S Corporation tax treatment comes from the fact that the corporation doesn’t pay taxes on its profits—all profits flow through to the individual shareholders’ tax returns.

Heads Up: The S Corporation Election Deadline Is Approaching

To make the S Corp election, you need to file Form 2553. If you want the election to be effective in the next tax year, you can file at any time during the tax year prior. If you’re filing in the year you want it to be effective, you must do so no more than two months and 15 days after the beginning of the tax year. According to the IRS, the “2-month period begins on the day of the month the tax year begins and ends with the close of the day before the numerically corresponding day of the second calendar month following that month. If there is no corresponding day, use the close of the last day of the calendar month.”

For existing C Corporations and LLCs, you have until March 21 to take the S Corp election for 2017.

New companies have 75 days from the date of their incorporation to file Form 2553. If they meet that deadline, they’ll receive S Corp tax treatment starting in their first tax year.

IRS Form 2553 provides additional detail about the filing deadlines and other important information, including S Corporation election eligibility restrictions.

Time Is Of The Essence For 2017

If you’re considering the S Corporation election for 2017, I recommend talking with a tax advisor to determine the potential impact it will have on your businesses tax obligations. If you find it is a great fit for your business, contact CorpNet as soon as possible to take care of filing your Form 2553 so you have the peace of mind it’s completed accurately. There’s still time (but not much!) to get it done before the deadline.

By | March 2nd, 2017|Other|0 Comments

Nellie in the News: February 2017

What a start to 2017! January and now February have flown by and we’re looking forward to a spring filled with lots of sunshine after these rainy past few months.

We have been busy in the office on the phones daily helping you incorporate a business, form an LLC, file a DBA and more across all 50 states!

Our CEO Nellie Akalp has been busy as always sharing her expertise and knowledge across the blogosphere. Check out her articles and press mentions from February below.

Want Nellie to speak at your next event or share her tips on your podcast? Contact her today

Interviews & press Mentions

Couple Money Podcast – How to Launch Your Business as a Couple http://bit.ly/2kCRINQ

Lead Genius – 10 Entrepreneurs & Inspiring Stories of Startup Success http://bit.ly/2lGPAsf

Susan Solovie – This Week in Small Business http://bit.ly/2m91Ceo

Entrepreneur – How to Legally Deduct Your Next Business Trip http://bit.ly/2lvmSJW

Small Business Trends – 10 Important Business Tips You Shouldn’t Overlook http://bit.ly/2lgVmfB

 

Expert Contributed Posts

SCORE – Top Three Considerations When Choosing Your Startup’s Business Structure http://bit.ly/2ksucFY

GoDaddy – 5 Signs Your Business has Outgrown It’s Legal Structure http://bit.ly/2kr8iDv

Freshbooks – Time to Hire: Make Sure Your Off-The-Cuff Interview Questions are Legal http://bit.ly/2l0D0Qu

Huffington Post – Five Signs your Business Would Be Better Off as an S Corporation http://huff.to/2lowsPC

Secret Entourage – How to Pick a Business Name for your Business http://bit.ly/2lh8m8S

Entrepreneur – 5 Tips for Growing as an Entrepreneur http://bit.ly/2m4BEok

UPS Store – Three Tips for Making your Small Business New Years Resolutions Last http://bit.ly/2kHjHuR

Small Business Trends – How to Avoid Double Taxation with an S Corporation http://bit.ly/2l58w47

By | February 28th, 2017|Other|0 Comments

There’s no shame in being just a great entrepreneur or just a great player

I coach kids sports. I started when my oldest son was playing basketball at the YMCA. I didn’t know much about the game as a coach, but luckily I had another dad to help me and we figured it out. It was so new to me and I wanted to do a great job. They were only 6 years old, so we got by. As my son grew, more and more coaching opportunities arose. I always got involved, one way or another. Sometimes my company would sponsor, other times I would help coach. He loved basketball and I never really understood it enough to help him. So I did what I could. He became the top scorer for his club team and eventually a star in high school. I knew I wasn’t the right coach for him, so I let others do the job. It worked.

Later in life, I had another son. This time, it was very different. I coach baseball, soccer and I’m about to start coaching his flag football team. I think I can help him become a great soccer player, as that is my expertise and more importantly, my passion. But he’s a star in hockey, not my expertise, and he loves it more than any other sport. So I coach the sports I know and love, and let the dads that actually know the game handle hockey. Knowing your limitations in life, at least the ones that lead to your happiness, is important.

Coaching is a lot like being a business owner and an entrepreneur. I’ve learned many things at each, but the one thing I remember is a coach is respected most when they put as much into the game as the team. Same holds true in business. When the CEO gives it their all and works closely with their team, supporting them each step of the way, but also being the “boss” when necessary, teams have the best chance of success. Coach Lombardi said, “Leaders are made, they are not born…” and I believe this to be true. So if your desire exists, you can do anything. If your desire exists…

As a player, we learn the game. As an employee, we learn the business. Both grow. One might become coach. The other, the boss. Is it important to have played on the field before becoming a great coach? Can a business owner with no experience become a great CEO? Maybe, but that’s not the company I would want to work for. Remember what happened when Apple brought in the Pepsi guy. Then, when Jobs returned, the company exploded. Passion and on field experience returned.

Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates have been in the trenches, on the field and have proven that they are great entrepreneurs and amazing CEOs. Like a player on the field, these guys started at the bottom and worked their way up. Their passion and dedication to doing something transformative, not always about money, was their driving force. Not all entrepreneurs can do this and not all should.

To sum this all up, some of us are entrepreneurs and maybe become a great CEO some day. Some of us are players and perhaps we can become a great coach. Desire, passion and commitment is what leads to these stages. If you are a great player, but have no passion to be a coach, stay off the field after retirement. Same goes for you entrepreneurs and CEOs. In the end, you will win the race you choose to run and more will likely benefit. There’s no shame in being just a great entrepreneur or just a great player.

By | February 16th, 2017|Business Operations, Entrepreneuring, Other|0 Comments

2017 Financial Goals for Small Business Owners

If you are a small business owner, you should be setting goals as early as possible so that you are not caught behind the eight ball as the year goes by. Sweeping changes are expected in 2017, and you’ll need to be ready. For example, it’s predicted that 2017 will be the year that video finally overtakes text as the No. 1 form of communication on the internet. 2017 will also mark the rise of the independent mobile commerce culture, and, of course, virtual reality is on the immediate horizon.

Here’s how to prepare for the changes ahead.

Target Your Niche Even More Precisely

In order to grow your business, shrink your marketing. The major search engines, like Google and Bing, continue to reward localization and punish wide-net marketing strategies. There is also more competition in 2017 than ever before, including premium prices on the best keywords. You will need to stretch out your long-tail keywords even further and delve more deeply into a local or niche culture in order to get that organic traffic that drives the highest conversion rates.

Bother People

Many small business owners believe that the advent of new communications technologies means an automatic influx of customers. Even with the hands-down best product on the market, this is never the case. More robust communications only means more noise as potential consumers are bombarded with a deluge of advertisements and indirect marketing. In order to stand out, you have to personalize your messages – even going customer by customer. You cannot be afraid to bother people, and rejection cannot bother you.

Create an Emergency Fund

The businesses that are prepared for emergencies well ahead of time will be the ones that have a strong chance of thriving in 2017. Make sure you have access to an emergency budget just in case the market gets a bit unpredictable and your business takes a hit. If your funds quickly run out and you find yourself managing debt some time in the next year, then make sure you look into debt management plan (DMP) options. A DMP, which is usually offered by a counseling service or financial services company specializing in debt management, will help you tailor a solution to your situation and create monthly payments within your budget.

Shore up Your Free Business Listings

Before you get into all of the advanced marketing strategies for 2017, you need to have all of your basic bases covered. Make sure that you have a business profile on all of the major search engine business platforms. Competitors today have no problem cannibalizing your listing and driving traffic away from you if you do not. Also, make sure that your NAP is exactly the same on all of your business listings, abbreviations and all.

Automate Your Social Media

You actually need to spend less time on social media if you are going to be successful in 2017. This does not mean that your customers see less of you – only that you spend less time actually producing your messages and opening lines of communication. There are simply too many automation tools that you can take advantage of to stay on social media all day. The longer that you stay on social media for business, the more likely you are to gradually drift over into wasteful clicking that will eat away at your workday.

Stretch Your Budget

If you are a small or midsize business, your money will be moving in many different directions at once – marketing, operations and administration – and you will need to learn how to use financial leverage in order to keep everything afloat. There are certain credit card strategies that you can take advantage of in 2017 if you have the right partner. The financial industry is finally beginning to catch up to new technology, and bankers are happily doing more business with their best customers through these new avenues. Make sure that you understand the wealth of new techniques that are now at your disposal.

Prepare for the new year by taking control of your small business finances. By using even one or more of these strategies, your business will be able to face any and all of 2017’s challenges.

Nellie in the News – January 2017

Another month has flown by – 2017 is off to a great start for us in the CorpNet office! Our New Year’s resolutions are still going strong. How about you?

Our CEO, Nellie Akalp has been busy as always in the press letting you know the best ways to start your business and how CorpNet can help! Call us today to incorporate, Form an LLC, file a DBA or for your other business formation needs.

Here’s a recap of what was published in January!

Interviews & press Mentions

Small Business Trends – 10 Essential Ingredients of a Successful Business http://bit.ly/2kjz7ti

Fundera – 19 Entrepreneurs Still on the Worst Business Advice They’ve Received http://bit.ly/2i1EA5H

tech.co – 14 Entrepreneurs Share Their Biggest Business Mistakes http://bit.ly/2js47WO

Neshprint – Top 18 Business Experts to Follow on Twitter http://bit.ly/2jVWZm0

Expert Contributed Posts

AllBusiness – Is Your Business Ready for the New Year? Here’s a Handy Checklist http://bit.ly/2j55HL4

franchise.org – Finding the Right Legal Structure for your Franchise http://bit.ly/2iN2KQo

Secret Entourage – Thinking of Selling your Business? Do these Things First http://bit.ly/2j06RYO

Small Business Trends – Is it Time to Incorporate your Business in the New Year? http://bit.ly/2iVOAwm

Huffington Post – Five Ways to Bring More Authenticity To Your Social Media http://huff.to/2jrfgEc

CRE Online – What’s the Best Way to Structure Multiple Real Estate Investments? http://bit.ly/2j24TaP

Accounting Today – How to Help Your Clients Decide if They Should Incorporate or Form an LLC http://bit.ly/2ihDnEj

Mashable – What’s the Best Business Structure For a First Time Founder? http://on.mash.to/2jg88Oe

Entrepreneur – How to Keep Proper Corporate Records http://bit.ly/2iPJjEN

Entrepreneur – The Pros and Cons of Incorporating in Delaware http://bit.ly/2jiAmaO

AllBusiness – Five Things Seasoned Small Business Owners can Learn from Rookie Entrepreneurs http://bit.ly/2jSdfCF

 

 

 

By | February 1st, 2017|Nellie in the News, Other|0 Comments