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2017 Financial Goals for Small Business Owners

If you are a small business owner, you should be setting goals as early as possible so that you are not caught behind the eight ball as the year goes by. Sweeping changes are expected in 2017, and you’ll need to be ready. For example, it’s predicted that 2017 will be the year that video finally overtakes text as the No. 1 form of communication on the internet. 2017 will also mark the rise of the independent mobile commerce culture, and, of course, virtual reality is on the immediate horizon.

Here’s how to prepare for the changes ahead.

Target Your Niche Even More Precisely

In order to grow your business, shrink your marketing. The major search engines, like Google and Bing, continue to reward localization and punish wide-net marketing strategies. There is also more competition in 2017 than ever before, including premium prices on the best keywords. You will need to stretch out your long-tail keywords even further and delve more deeply into a local or niche culture in order to get that organic traffic that drives the highest conversion rates.

Bother People

Many small business owners believe that the advent of new communications technologies means an automatic influx of customers. Even with the hands-down best product on the market, this is never the case. More robust communications only means more noise as potential consumers are bombarded with a deluge of advertisements and indirect marketing. In order to stand out, you have to personalize your messages – even going customer by customer. You cannot be afraid to bother people, and rejection cannot bother you.

Create an Emergency Fund

The businesses that are prepared for emergencies well ahead of time will be the ones that have a strong chance of thriving in 2017. Make sure you have access to an emergency budget just in case the market gets a bit unpredictable and your business takes a hit. If your funds quickly run out and you find yourself managing debt some time in the next year, then make sure you look into debt management plan (DMP) options. A DMP, which is usually offered by a counseling service or financial services company specializing in debt management, will help you tailor a solution to your situation and create monthly payments within your budget.

Shore up Your Free Business Listings

Before you get into all of the advanced marketing strategies for 2017, you need to have all of your basic bases covered. Make sure that you have a business profile on all of the major search engine business platforms. Competitors today have no problem cannibalizing your listing and driving traffic away from you if you do not. Also, make sure that your NAP is exactly the same on all of your business listings, abbreviations and all.

Automate Your Social Media

You actually need to spend less time on social media if you are going to be successful in 2017. This does not mean that your customers see less of you – only that you spend less time actually producing your messages and opening lines of communication. There are simply too many automation tools that you can take advantage of to stay on social media all day. The longer that you stay on social media for business, the more likely you are to gradually drift over into wasteful clicking that will eat away at your workday.

Stretch Your Budget

If you are a small or midsize business, your money will be moving in many different directions at once – marketing, operations and administration – and you will need to learn how to use financial leverage in order to keep everything afloat. There are certain credit card strategies that you can take advantage of in 2017 if you have the right partner. The financial industry is finally beginning to catch up to new technology, and bankers are happily doing more business with their best customers through these new avenues. Make sure that you understand the wealth of new techniques that are now at your disposal.

Prepare for the new year by taking control of your small business finances. By using even one or more of these strategies, your business will be able to face any and all of 2017’s challenges.

Nellie in the News – January 2017

Another month has flown by – 2017 is off to a great start for us in the CorpNet office! Our New Year’s resolutions are still going strong. How about you?

Our CEO, Nellie Akalp has been busy as always in the press letting you know the best ways to start your business and how CorpNet can help! Call us today to incorporate, Form an LLC, file a DBA or for your other business formation needs.

Here’s a recap of what was published in January!

Interviews & press Mentions

Small Business Trends – 10 Essential Ingredients of a Successful Business http://bit.ly/2kjz7ti

Fundera – 19 Entrepreneurs Still on the Worst Business Advice They’ve Received http://bit.ly/2i1EA5H

tech.co – 14 Entrepreneurs Share Their Biggest Business Mistakes http://bit.ly/2js47WO

Neshprint – Top 18 Business Experts to Follow on Twitter http://bit.ly/2jVWZm0

Expert Contributed Posts

AllBusiness – Is Your Business Ready for the New Year? Here’s a Handy Checklist http://bit.ly/2j55HL4

franchise.org – Finding the Right Legal Structure for your Franchise http://bit.ly/2iN2KQo

Secret Entourage – Thinking of Selling your Business? Do these Things First http://bit.ly/2j06RYO

Small Business Trends – Is it Time to Incorporate your Business in the New Year? http://bit.ly/2iVOAwm

Huffington Post – Five Ways to Bring More Authenticity To Your Social Media http://huff.to/2jrfgEc

CRE Online – What’s the Best Way to Structure Multiple Real Estate Investments? http://bit.ly/2j24TaP

Accounting Today – How to Help Your Clients Decide if They Should Incorporate or Form an LLC http://bit.ly/2ihDnEj

Mashable – What’s the Best Business Structure For a First Time Founder? http://on.mash.to/2jg88Oe

Entrepreneur – How to Keep Proper Corporate Records http://bit.ly/2iPJjEN

Entrepreneur – The Pros and Cons of Incorporating in Delaware http://bit.ly/2jiAmaO

AllBusiness – Five Things Seasoned Small Business Owners can Learn from Rookie Entrepreneurs http://bit.ly/2jSdfCF

 

 

 

By | February 1st, 2017|Nellie in the News, Other|0 Comments

What Every Small Business Should Know About 1099s

Every year when tax time rolls around, I field questions from business owners about whether or not they need to send 1099s to their vendors. As common as 1099 forms are, they remain one of the most misunderstood Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirements.

To make sure you understand the circumstances under which the IRS requires issuing 1099-MISC forms to vendors, I’m going to provide some basic “must-know” information here.

What Is A Form 1099-MISC?

You must issue an IRS Form 1099-MISC to each person you’ve paid $600 or more in services (including parts and materials), prizes and awards, rents or other income payments. The 1099-MISC only applies to payments you made in doing business; it does not apply to payments made for personal purposes.

To Whom Do You Need To Send A Form 1099-MISC?

If your business paid more than $600 to a vendor or sub-contractor [individual, partnership, Limited Liability Company (LLC), Limited Partnership (LP), or estate], you are required to send a Form 1099-MISC to document what you paid them throughout the year. In general, anyone who worked for you—other than your employees—will need a 1099 from you.

Also, unless an exception applies to them, you need to issue a 1099 to your landlord if you are paying rent for business purposes. You must also issue a 1099-MISC to your attorney if you paid for legal services that amounted to more than $600 during the year.

Are There Any Exceptions?

There are. The list is rather long, but most commonly these types of vendors do not get 1099-MISC forms:

Also, you don’t have to send 1099-MISC forms to vendors to whom you made your payments via a credit card, debit card, gift card, or a payment network like PayPal. The onus to report vendor compensation is on those payment companies.

How Do You Figure Out If A Vendor Needs A 1099 From You?

I recommend before you request vendors to do any work for you, ask them for a completed W-9 form. The W-9 will give you all the information you need for filing taxes. It supplies a vendor’s mailing information, Tax ID numbers, and business structure (so you’ll know if the vendor is incorporated or not and does or does not need a 1099).

When Is the Deadline To Send 1099s?

By January 31, 2017, you must do two things to comply with your 2016 tax year 1099 obligations:

  • Submit Form 1099 to each vendor (reflecting what you paid that vendor in 2016).
  • Submit a copy of the Forms 1099 you sent to each vendor, along with a Form 1096 that discloses in total what you paid to all vendors who received 1099s from you.

Make sure you check on your state’s rules, too. Some states require they also receive your 1099s.

What Happens If You Miss The Deadline? 

Sending the required 1099-MISC forms late (or not at all) could cost you. The penalties vary depending on how far past the deadline you wait to issue the forms. If your business had gross receipts of $5 million or less, the amount you’re smacked with could range anywhere $50 to $260 per form (for tax years 2016 and 2017). If you’re caught intentionally not providing a payee with a correct statement for tax year 2016, you could face a fine of $520 for each form not submitted (that amount will increase to $530 for tax year 2017).

Where Can You Get 1099 Forms?

Unfortunately, you cannot download 1099 Forms from the IRS website. You can, however, order them from the IRS site and have them mailed to you, or you can pick them up at an IRS service center, post office, or another location that supplies them.

Eliminate Headaches—Do It Right From The Start!

Whether you’re in the early stages of launching a startup or already running a small business, I recommend you talk with a tax professional who can share more details about 1099s and the other aspects of filing your tax returns.

Starting a business or ready to change your current business structure? Contact us about making the registration process hassle-free and as fast as possible. We’re here to handle all of your legal document filing needs!

Five Steps To Becoming An Empowered Woman (Or Man) Business Owner

As a woman business owner, I’ve found that empowerment comes to us in two ways:

1. Access to external sources of inspiration and knowledge

2. Self-respect and self-confidence

You can sit around and wait for someone to empower you, or you can take the bull by the horns and take action to empower yourself. I will always vote for the latter of the two because it gives you more control over your entrepreneurial destiny.

Although women own nearly 30 percent of U.S. small businesses (according to the Status of Women in the United States website), I find that many of us still struggle with accepting it’s OK to seek empowerment on our own. We often think of it as something that is handed to us. That doesn’t seem very empowering to me!

So, what can women entrepreneurs (and men, too) do to boost our level of empowerment and reach our personal and professional potential?

1. Recognize what knowledge and skills you lack, and find tools and resources to increase your proficiency.

This requires a commitment to honestly assessing your strengths and weaknesses. After you’ve done that, actively seek blogs, books, webinars, podcasts, conferences, mentors, and other resources that will help you get up to speed.

2. Align yourself with positive people (professionally and personally).

I cannot emphasize enough how much this affects morale and motivation. Chronically negative people drain your energy and enthusiasm. When they direct their skepticism and sarcasm at you and your endeavors, they deplete your self-confidence and leave you feeling defeated. As much as possible, minimize your exposure to them so you can fill your life with people who truly care about you and who will encourage rather than discourage you.

3. When you meet people who exude empowerment, ask them if they’ll share their insight about attaining that level of confidence.

I’ve found most people who have an empowered aura about them are immensely gracious and open to sharing about how they’ve helped themselves. I encourage you to reach out to them for inspiration. Even though their approach may not work with precision for you, you will no doubt take away some valuable ideas to apply in your own quest for empowerment.

4. Start the day on a note of gratitude.

I make it a point to devote a few minutes every day to consciously thinking about everything I have to be thankful for. What better way to get a positive start? It immediately puts me in the right frame of mind for dealing with whatever work and life will bring my way. This is so simple to do. I dare you to find an excuse as to why you can’t try this!

5. Acknowledge that mistakes and setbacks happen.

Because they will. The good news is they won’t make you a failure unless you dwell on them. Get beyond goofs and misfortunes by treating them as lessons learned and by remaining agile so you can shift gears and move in a new positive and productive direction.

6.  Don’t be afraid to say “no” or voice your position. 

If people ask too much of you, learn to say “no.” Overextending yourself will create excess stress and pull you away from what really matters. Also, don’t be afraid to voice your opinion when you disagree adamantly about something. Although initially you might meet criticism, in the long run you’ll gain more respect. Most importantly, you’ll respect yourself—and that is mission critical for feeling empowered.

Empowerment Begins With Embracing Its Power

Whether you’re a female or male entrepreneur and regardless of whether you’re just starting a business or have been running your company for years, empowerment wields great power. I urge you to embrace its potential to help you mold your vision and achieve your goals and dreams.

Providing legal document filing services at affordable rates, CorpNet.com helps business owners save time and money. Empower yourself by knowing your business registration and compliance filings are in capable hands. Contact us today!

How Job Titles Can Help You Hire Great Talent

So it’s a new year, and you’re looking to hire new talent. You start off by posting a job online, but you’re not finding many candidates, at least not the great ones your company needs. How come? You may not realize this, but the job titles on your postings might be the reason.

Professionals care about the job title a company will provide them with (as well as one they’ll be proud to boast on their resumes in the new year). If you spend enough time looking at other job descriptions and titles, you’ll begin to notice a trend. There’s an increase in outside of the norm job titles. Riding this trend could help you recruit better candidates.

So what should you do heading into the new year? Spend more time crafting your job titles.

Here’s why job titles are so important in the hiring process.

They Help You Target the Type of Person You’re Looking to Recruit

Millennials are looking for different types of job titles than seasoned professionals, so depending on who you want to attract, you may need to tweak your titles accordingly. Those who have been around the block in their careers may be searching for more traditional job titles, while the fresh-out-of-college set may like funkier titles like “Brand Evangelist.”

Your Job Title is Your Welcome Mat

The first thing a potential candidate sees on a job board is your job title. Consider it your click-bait: if the title is boring or uninspiring, some job seekers won’t click to see what qualities you’re looking for. On the other hand, if you spend time coming up with a concise job title, you’ll attract more candidates to choose from.

Being Specific Narrows Your Applicant Pool

On the other hand, you may not want tons of applicants but prefer to have only highly-qualified folks with a very specific skillset submit their resumes to you. Be sure to use precise terms like “Senior” or industry knowledge keywords you want in the job title to winnow down those that will apply.

But Being Overly Zany Might Put You in the Corner

Yes, companies like Google are replacing older keywords like “Human Resources” with “People Specialists,” but that might not be the best strategy for your company. The problem with getting too off-the-wall is that people won’t be searching for your one-of-a-kind job title. Even if internally, you call your programmers “Awesomeness Creators,” you can still use more traditional job titles in your search to ensure that people find your posting.

Your Job Titles Speak Volumes About Your Company Culture

Just like you will be assessing job candidates, those same professionals will be assessing your company. If your job titles are more creative, you might give off a startup culture vibe, which is appealing to many. Or, your more traditional titles might lure experienced professionals looking for stability and familiarity. Consider the ethos you want to portray with your company as you craft your titles.

Creating Better Job Titles

Just because you’ve had a Marketing Manager for years doesn’t mean the next person that fills that role needs to have the same title. Before you post your next open position on job boards, review what that role currently consists of. It likely has evolved over the past several years, and the job title should reflect that. Maybe now that role looks more like a Content Marketing Guru or a Social Media Manager. The more specific you get with the title, the more appealing it will be to the right candidates.

See what your competitors are calling similar roles and determine if you want to mimic those titles or branch off from them. You want candidates to be able to find your job listing, so you might not want to get too creative.

And skip the acronyms or abbreviated words, as well as internal reference IDs (Marketing Mgr Ex75-4). These only make it harder for job seekers to search for your position.

Above all, keep your job titles short and searchable. Leave the details for the job description itself. Consider what a candidate might search for to find your position on a job board. Search there yourself to see how good a fit your role is in search results. And if over time, you don’t get the caliber of candidates you’re seeking, you can always update that job title; it’s not set in stone.

When you post an open position, you are, in a sense, marketing it to potential buyers — or applicants. If you want qualified leads — applications — you’ve got to put the effort into developing the most relevant and appealing job title possible.

Should You Buy A Business Or Start One From Scratch?

Hope your New Year is off to a great start! As you’re looking to make 2017 a year of prosperity, have you set your sights on becoming a business owner? If so, you’re probably wondering whether buying an existing business or starting your own company will offer the best chances of success.

Both have their advantages and challenges, so how do you choose? I wish there were an easy answer, but I’m afraid you’ll need to do some research and put some serious thought into your decision. As you explore your options, consider the following pros and cons of starting a business from scratch and buying an established one.

Pros Of Starting From Scratch
• You begin with a squeaky clean slate, establishing and building your brand reputation from Day 1.
• You build your team fresh and new, selecting the right people for the right positions.
• You create your workflows to maximize productivity, without having any inefficient past processes to “fix.”
• You choose and develop the products, services, and packages you’ll offer to your customers.
• You establish your pricing to ensure profitability from the start.
• You choose your business’s legal structure to ensure the degree of liability protection you need and the most favorable tax situation.

Pros Of Buying A Business
• You have customers and incoming revenue immediately.
• You have employees who already know how to do their jobs and don’t need training.
• You have built-in processes and systems to operate your business efficiently.
• Your services and products are already to market, and you have established sales channels to get them into customers’ hands.
• Your business is already registered and has the necessary permits and licenses to operate legally in your state.

Cons Of Starting From Scratch
• You do all the legwork, including researching the registration requirements to form an LLC or incorporate your business and filing your state, federal, and local paperwork to operate legally.
• You don’t know for certain that your business idea will be viable and sustainable.
• You have to develop and put into place all the internal systems and processes needed to operate your business.

Cons Of Buying A Business
• Existing employees may be resistant to accept your leadership.
• If you find processes aren’t working efficiently, it may be difficult to initiate change because everyone is used to doing things a certain way.
• You may discover the legal business structure the former owners selected isn’t ideal.
• You may find your brand’s reputation isn’t as positive as you’d like it to be—that might be difficult to turn around.

As you can see, there’s a lot to think about as you weigh the options of starting your own business or purchasing one that is already up and running. I advise you to do your homework before deciding which route to travel. And consider seeking the guidance of respected and reputable professionals (attorneys, accountants, business consultants, etc.) who can help you understand the financial and legal aspects of what’s involved.

Remember, whether you’re starting a business or opt to buy and run one that’s already established, CorpNet is here to assist you with all your business registration and compliance obligations. Contact us today to help you take care of your filings so you can take care of business!

 

 

Announcing the CorpNet Partner Program – Recorded Webinar Explains the Program in Detail

The CorpNet Partner Program is already ahead of expectations. Partners are signing up rapidly. They are already selling formation services and making their clients happy while increasing their revenue. We are so pleased with the results and we want to thank all of our partners for their commitment and friendship. 

Recently, our CEO, Nellie Akalp hosted a webinar on astUtemy helping our partners learn about the program. The questions where amazing and plentiful and we recorded it! Now you can watch that webinar as often as you wish to make sure you know and understand the program so you may achieve maximum benefit.

If you’re not yet a partner, sign up right now. Click here to get started. It takes only seconds, it’s free and you will make more money right away.

By | January 14th, 2017|Partner Program|0 Comments

Dos And Don’ts When Transferring Leadership Responsibilities: Lessons To Learn From Obama and Trump

Changes in leadership don’t always happen seamlessly—or amicably. As is evident with the imminent transfer of leadership from President Obama to President-Elect Donald Trump, many factors influence how smoothly (or not) a change in authority will happen.

Whether you’re taking over running a business or handing over the reins to your responsibilities to someone else, expect some bumps in the road. But be careful not to become a source of agitation and dissent through the process. This recent presidential election, which has been simultaneously entertaining and frustrating at times, can teach us some valuable lessons about what to do and what not to do during a leadership transition.

 

Lessons Learned From Obama and Trump: The Dos And Don’ts Of Changing Leaders

  • Don’t undermine the capabilities of either the incoming or outgoing leader.

If you’re the new boss in town, bad-mouthing the outgoing person in charge won’t sit well with those loyal to their incumbent leader. And if you’re the one passing the baton, lack of confidence in the new leader will create distrust and distract employees from performing to their potential. To minimize the stress your team may already be feeling over the change, resist the impulse to undercut the qualities and strengths of one another

  • Don’t expect everyone to be enamored with the change.

While some of your staff members might be excited about the new era ahead, you can bet others will be anxious, annoyed, or angry—possibly all three. Prepare to bear the brunt of their harsh criticism whether you’re the new leader or the one leaving your post.

  • Don’t underestimate the power of words.

I saw a quote online that really resonates with me, “Words are free. It’s how you use them that may cost you.” Keep this in mind as you navigate the challenges of handing over or accepting leadership responsibilities. Through this recent presidential election, we’ve seen how choosing and using words reactively can create animosity and negativity. Before speaking and before writing, pause to think about your words and choose them carefully before you share them with business colleagues, employees, vendors, customers, and the public at large.

  • Do show enthusiasm for continued progress toward common goals.

Find points of agreement where you and the other leader can demonstrate unity. Sure, you may not see eye to eye about plenty of things related to how the business should be run, but now isn’t the time to dwell on that. Your employees need to have some sense of consistency and common ground.

  • Do provide/accept information and insight to make the transition fluid.

As the outgoing leader, be cooperative by openly sharing essential information with the new leader so she can more adeptly step into your shoes. As the new leader, be open and receptive to the insight the outgoing leader has to share. Put ego aside and realize your predecessor has knowledge and experience that can help you lead more effectively.

 

Your Top Priority As A Leader

Both outgoing and incoming leaders have one thing in common: a job to do! Pointing fingers, making snarky remarks, and stirring up drama will only distract you from doing right by those who work in your business and those who do business with your company. If you keep that in mind through every step of the process, the transfer of leadership will go much more smoothly.

 

Remember, Corpnet.com is here to help leaders of businesses in all industries take care of the business filings needed to legally run their companies. Check out our FREE Corporate Compliance Tool, and contact us today about how we can save you time and money.

 

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By | January 13th, 2017|Corporate & Business Law, Entrepreneuring|0 Comments

To-Dos When Starting a Part-Time Business

So you’re not ready to quit your “day job,” but you want to start a business? Many entrepreneurs dip their toes to test the waters by launching their businesses part-time. In some ways, it’s the best of both worlds; you pursue your dream of business ownership while still bringing home a steady paycheck.

Although there are some considerations unique to starting a business part-time, you’ll find other aspects are the same as when starting a company full-time.

For example, you have to take the necessary steps to operate your business legally.

 

  1. Make sure you can legally use your business name.

Either check your state’s Secretary of State database or do a corporate name search to see if anyone else has registered the name you want. I also advise using CorpNet’s free trademark search tool to see if someone has already filed for a trademark on the name.

  1. Select a business structure.

By default, your business will be considered a sole proprietor unless you file for a different legal structure. Operating as a sole proprietorship offers simplicity, but it does not separate your personal and business finances and liabilities. That means if your business is sued, your personal assets might be in jeopardy.

I recommend considering formally registering your business by either forming an LLC (Limited Liability Company) or incorporating (C Corporation or S Corporation) to protect yourself. Doing so shields your personal assets from the liabilities of your company.

Before talking with an attorney for guidance, you can start learning about the advantages of different business structures by using CorpNet’s Business Structure Wizard.

Note that the different structures offer different taxation pros and cons, so I suggest also talking with an accounting or tax professional to explore which structure will work best for you in that respect.

  1. Register your business name.

When you form an LLC or incorporate your business in your state, registration of your name automatically happens. However, if you choose to operate as a sole proprietor and want to use a fictitious name for your company, you must register your business name by filing a Doing Business As (DBA). Don’t skip this step! It will allow you to operate your business under that name in your state and it will prevent other sole proprietors in your state from using that name.

  1. Get the licenses and permits you need.

Depending on the type of business you’re operating and where you’re located, you may have to secure licenses and permits to legally run your business. Federal, state, county, and/or local licenses and permits might apply to you. To avoid costly penalties and fines, research which permits and licenses you need to have to legally run your business.

 

Part-time Doesn’t Mean You Should Approach It Half-Heartedly.

Aside from the legal considerations in starting your part-time business, keep these things in mind, as well:

  • Know your limits.

There are only so many hours in each day, so carefully assess your capacity to work in and on your business before jumping in.

  • Make sure there’s no conflict of interest or legal restrictions.

Check with your employer about any rules that would prevent you from starting and operating your type of business while still on that company’s payroll.

  • Take it seriously.

Although you may still be working for someone else in your other job, you’ll need to give your part-time business serious time and energy if you ever want to make it a full-time endeavor.

 

Need Help Getting Your Part-time Startup Off The Ground?

If you’re planning to give part-time entrepreneurship a go, CorpNet is here to help you take care of all the business filings required to legally launch and run your business. Contact us today to make sure your part-time business has all of its registration paperwork submitted accurately and on time.

By | January 11th, 2017|Running A Small Business, Starting a Business|2 Comments

What Will Your Story Be?

We dream big. We sleep little. We think much. We’re entrepreneurs and before we die, we will add a page to the history books (or at least Wikipedia). Our story began when we were born and it’s been one hell of a ride ever since. Sound familiar?

Speaking of stories, on January 3, 1977, Apple was incorporated. While their story began prior, that date will always be remembered. A couple of guys in a garage with nothing more than passion and intellect literally changed the world. It’s a heck of a story and it’s been told several times online, in books, and often from Hollywood.

For the rest of us, we dream about it. We want to leave our mark. We want to change the world, even if just a little bit. Maybe we just want the cash money riches that success can bring or maybe we want to be famous or maybe, we don’t care, we just love to make things and fix stuff. I’m pretty sure Jobs and Wozniak never really thought much about their story. They were too busy making things and tinkering and solving problem after problem after problem. They made something useful and they made money and I’d bet at some point, they looked back and said something like, “we did that” and the story continued. I wouldn’t be typing this post on my shiny iPhone 7 Plus right now if not for that day and the many days before and after where passion and perseverance performed perfectly in pursuit of perfection. More importantly, the story started and it’s only just begun.

Steve is gone. I miss him and his story making abilities. Today, Apple continues to add pages to its story every day. I try to do the same. You should too.

By | January 6th, 2017|Entrepreneuring|4 Comments