/Tag:business structure

Should You Buy A Business Or Start One From Scratch?

Hope your New Year is off to a great start! As you’re looking to make 2017 a year of prosperity, have you set your sights on becoming a business owner? If so, you’re probably wondering whether buying an existing business or starting your own company will offer the best chances of success.

Both have their advantages and challenges, so how do you choose? I wish there were an easy answer, but I’m afraid you’ll need to do some research and put some serious thought into your decision. As you explore your options, consider the following pros and cons of starting a business from scratch and buying an established one.

Pros Of Starting From Scratch
• You begin with a squeaky clean slate, establishing and building your brand reputation from Day 1.
• You build your team fresh and new, selecting the right people for the right positions.
• You create your workflows to maximize productivity, without having any inefficient past processes to “fix.”
• You choose and develop the products, services, and packages you’ll offer to your customers.
• You establish your pricing to ensure profitability from the start.
• You choose your business’s legal structure to ensure the degree of liability protection you need and the most favorable tax situation.

Pros Of Buying A Business
• You have customers and incoming revenue immediately.
• You have employees who already know how to do their jobs and don’t need training.
• You have built-in processes and systems to operate your business efficiently.
• Your services and products are already to market, and you have established sales channels to get them into customers’ hands.
• Your business is already registered and has the necessary permits and licenses to operate legally in your state.

Cons Of Starting From Scratch
• You do all the legwork, including researching the registration requirements to form an LLC or incorporate your business and filing your state, federal, and local paperwork to operate legally.
• You don’t know for certain that your business idea will be viable and sustainable.
• You have to develop and put into place all the internal systems and processes needed to operate your business.

Cons Of Buying A Business
• Existing employees may be resistant to accept your leadership.
• If you find processes aren’t working efficiently, it may be difficult to initiate change because everyone is used to doing things a certain way.
• You may discover the legal business structure the former owners selected isn’t ideal.
• You may find your brand’s reputation isn’t as positive as you’d like it to be—that might be difficult to turn around.

As you can see, there’s a lot to think about as you weigh the options of starting your own business or purchasing one that is already up and running. I advise you to do your homework before deciding which route to travel. And consider seeking the guidance of respected and reputable professionals (attorneys, accountants, business consultants, etc.) who can help you understand the financial and legal aspects of what’s involved.

Remember, whether you’re starting a business or opt to buy and run one that’s already established, CorpNet is here to assist you with all your business registration and compliance obligations. Contact us today to help you take care of your filings so you can take care of business!

 

 

Filing an LLC – FAQ

We are excited to bring you another post in our monthly FAQ series! This month, our CEO Nellie Akalp is answering questions about one of the hottest entity types for small businesses – the LLC. What are the requirements of filing an LLC? What are the benefits? Read on to find out!

Q: What are the benefits of forming an LLC?

A: In an LLC, the owner’s personal assets are shielded from business liabilities just as they would be in a corporation. In addition, the IRS views the LLC as a “disregarded entity.” Thus, an LLC does not file separate taxes; company profits and losses flow through to the owners and are subject to each owner’s individual tax rates. The LLC is great for a business that wants liability protection, but seeks minimal formality. It’s also the perfect structure for a business with foreign owners since anyone (C Corp, S Corp, another LLC, a trust, or an estate) can be an owner of an LLC.

Q: Do I need to prepare an Operating Agreement to form an LLC?

A: You’re not required to create an operating agreement in order to form an LLC, but in many states you will be required to keep an operating agreement at your place of business to maintain your corporate compliance. And even if your state does not require a formal operating agreement, it can be an important document to help clarify verbal agreements between owners and prevent misunderstandings.

Q: What is an Operating Agreement?

A: The Operating Agreement is an official contract that spells out the management and ownership of the LLC. It can outline details like how much of the company each member owns, everyone’s voting rights; how profits and losses should be distributed among the members; and what happens when someone wants to leave the business.

Q: Do I need to submit my LLC’s Operating Agreement?

A: You’re not required to submit a formal operating agreement to the state or any other entity. But, most states do require that an LLC has an operating agreement in place and kept at their place of business.

Q: Are there any differences between how an LLC and S Corporation are taxed?

A: Both the LLC and S Corporation can be taxed on a pass-through basis; taxes aren’t paid on the entity level, but at the individual owner level. Profits and losses are passed through and reported on the individual’s tax return. While both LLCs and S Corporations are pass-through entities, there are a few differences.

One difference is that the income of an LLC flows to the members involved with the business and is subject to self-employment tax. With an S Corporation, only salaries are subject to self-employment tax; any distributions that are paid out to members are not subject to self-employment tax.

Another key difference is that the LLC offers a lot more flexibility in terms of how owners can be taxed. With the S Corporation, owners must be taxed based on their pro rata ownership interests; if you own 50% of the business, then you’re taxed on 50% of the company’s profits. With an LLC, owners can determine their allocations for the year and be taxed accordingly.

Q: Can one person form an LLC?

A: Yes, all states allow one member LLCs.

Q: Does an LLC have stockholders?

A: No. LLCs are not permitted to issue stock in any state. Only corporations (C- or S-Corporations) can issue stock.

Q: How is an LLC structured?

A: LLCs have members – these are the owners of the LLC and are similar to stockholders in a corporation. Members typically receive an ownership stake in the LLC commensurate with their investment (either financial investment or ‘sweat equity’). In addition, members choose a manager to manage the LLC – this position is similar to a director of a corporation. A manager can be a member or could be someone from outside the LLC.

Q: Does an LLC need to hold an annual meeting?

A: No state requires an LLC to hold an annual meeting. This is one of the benefits of the LLC – it has fewer formalities than a corporation. However, if your LLC’s operating agreement requires an annual meeting (or other meetings), then you’ll need to hold such meetings in order to stay compliant. Many owners choose to make meetings optional in the operating agreement.

Q: What’s the difference between an LLC and PLLC?

A: In many states, licensed professionals, such as lawyers, doctors, architects, and accountants, aren’t allowed to form LLCs. Instead, these professionals can form a PLLC (Professional Limited Liability Company). One of the key differences between an LLC and PLLC is that members of the PLLC must be licensed professionals, and you’ll need to show proof of a valid license to register the PLLC. In most cases, members of a PLLC are personally liable for their own malpractice claims, but aren’t personally liable for another professional’s malpractice claims.

Do you need help registering an LLC or have a questions regarding the process? Call the CorpNet.com team today for a free business consultation at: 888.449.2638

The Series LLC – All You Need to Know!

What Is The Series LLC (SLLC) Business Structure?

The series LLC (or SLLC for short) allows multiple “series” within a master LLC to operate as separate entities (with their own names, bank accounts, and record keeping). Each series can conduct business independently in this way because series LLCs’ articles of formation explicitly allow them to have unrestricted segregation of membership interests, assets, liabilities, and operations.

Different members and managers might run each series, and their rights and responsibilities might vary from series to series. Each individual series may secure contracts, own property, sue, and be sued without affecting the other series under the series LLC.

Most significant about the series LLC is the liability protection it provides. Similar to a corporation with subsidiaries, one series’ assets are protected from the liability risks of other series under the master series LLC. What’s particularly attractive about a series LLC is the level of protection it offers comes without the cost of setting up new legal entities for each series. The series LLC is subject to just one formation filing fee, no matter how many series are a part of it.

Where And How Can You Set Up A Series LLC?

Not all states allow the formation of series LLCs, so the structure is not an option for every business everywhere. States currently allowing formation of series LLCs include: Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Nevada, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah.

Forming a series LLC works similarly to forming a traditional LLC. It involves filing articles of organization in the state for your master LLC. (Most likely the state will require that your articles of organization express that the LLC is authorized to form series under it). You’ll also need to create operating agreements to document the rules for overall operations of the master LLC and for each series you know you want to form. The operating agreements for each series will define any unique rules that apply to the individual series. (Note that you can add more series as needed in the future.)

What Types Of Businesses Might Benefit From The Series LLC Structure?

Series LLCs offer a good deal of flexibility and simplicity. Business owners such as real estate investors with multiple properties, franchisees with multiple locations, and other companies with distinct profit centers might benefit from forming a series LLC to separate and protect each operation.

What Else Should You Know?

With series LLCs being a fairly new legal structure, not all tax issues are completely clear across the board. While federal proposed regulation considers series to be their own entities for income tax purposes (which means they must file their own tax returns and pay their own tax obligations), tax treatment at the state level could be different.

No matter what legal business structure you’re considering, I strongly encourage you to get trusted professional legal and accounting guidance before making that all-important decision. And after you’ve done your homework and have all the knowledge you need to choose wisely, don’t risk missing anything mission critical during the formation process. At CorpNet, we’re here to help you save time and headaches by taking care of all the filing details for you. From series LLCs to regular LLCs to S-Corporations to C-Corporations, contact us to cover all your business filing needs!