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Where Should YOU Incorporate YOUR Business?

By: Tom

Many questions invariably arise throughout the process of incorporating or forming an LLC for your business. By far, one of the most common questions is…where? And more often than not, the question is framed as, “Should I incorporate in Delaware or Nevada?”

These two states are hot choices for incorporation; and for good reason. Many larger corporations choose Delaware because it offers some of the most developed, flexible, and pro-business statutes in the country. And Nevada is increasingly becoming a popular choice for businesses due to its low filing fees, as well as the lack of state corporate income, franchise, and personal income taxes.

However, as a general rule of thumb, if your corporation or LLC will have less than five shareholders or members (a condition which applies to the bulk of small businesses), it’s best to incorporate or form an LLC in the state where your business has a physical presence. In other words, unless your business has a physical office in Delaware or Nevada, it’s going to be much easier and less expensive in the long run to incorporate or form an LLC in your home state.Here’s one example that highlights the situation. Susan owns a soap-making business in Maryland and is considering incorporating in Delaware. However, what Susan doesn’t realize is that Maryland has rather strong rules pertaining to bank accounts. As an ‘out of state’ business, she would need to get permission in order to open a business bank account in Maryland (even though she lives right down the road from the bank). And opening a bank account in Delaware won’t be so easy either without any kind of physical address in the state.

And that’s just one particular (albeit very common) logistical challenge. There are countless other potential hurdles, and added fees.

For example, when a business incorporates ‘Out of State’ (for instance, in Delaware), there may be additional filings and fees in both the state of incorporation as well as the state where they live and run their business. These can include:

For the state where a business incorporates:

  • Appointing a Registered Agent in THAT state
  • Paying filing fees in THAT state
  • Filing annual reports in THAT state

And then, for the state of residence (or where the business is physically located):

  • Appointing a Registered Agent in THIS state
  • Paying filing fees in THIS state
  • Filing annual reports in THIS state
  • Qualifying as a Foreign Corporation in THIS state
  • Paying taxes in THIS state

I can’t overemphasize that last point, as it is a common misconception among many small business owners that I talk to. When you’re just starting out, the tax burden can seem overwhelming. It’s only natural to be concerned about your taxes, and certainly those tax laws in Nevada are incredibly appealing.

However, just because you incorporate your business in Nevada does not mean those are the only state tax laws that apply to your business. While Nevada may not charge state income taxes for your corporation, the state where your business is physically located will come after you for those taxes sooner or later. Adding insult to injury, your tax liability may actually increase because you’re viewed as a foreign entity operating in the state.

Pretty soon, any benefits from incorporating in Delaware or Nevada are diluted with the added fees and paperwork of operating out of state. Don’t fall prey to the hype over these business-friendly states. The benefits are really limited to larger businesses (ones with more than five shareholders).

As a small business owner, you’re already contending with enough paperwork and fees as it is. Don’t add more to your workload by trying to operate out of state. In this case, the simplest route of incorporating in your home state turns out to be best.

CorpNet.com’s professional staff is here to assist you every step of the way… And once you know what you’re required to file, we can take care of the details for you!  If you have specific legal questions or concerns, you should consult an attorney for sound advice. After all, your business is worth it.

Please feel free to reach out to me with any questions to nakalp@corpnet.com ; I get you because I’m just like you and have been through this myself!

Good luck!

*Original content written by Nellie Akalp for Small Business Trends

Nellie Akalp

Nellie Akalp

Nellie Akalp is a passionate entrepreneur, small business advocate and mother of four. As CEO of CorpNet.com, a legal document preparation filing service, Nellie helps entrepreneurs start a business, Incorporate, Form an LLC, set up Sole Proprietorships (DBAs) and maintain a business in compliance with state filing requirements for a new or existing business.

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